Public more concerned about climate change and more switching to renewable energy, says Government


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More people are “very concerned” about climate change than ever before, according to official Government survey.

The proportion of people describing themselves as "very concerned" about climate change has hit 35 per cent in the latest Government survey on the topic, the highest level recorded since the questionnaire began in 2012.

The results are from the latest ‘public attitudes tracker’ published by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

Two thousand adults across the UK in March were questioned on their views on energy and climate change.

It reveals a record 80 per cent of the public are now "very" or "fairly" concerned about climate change. This is an increase on the 65 per cent of the public in 2012 and 74 per cent in March 2018 who described themselves as concerned about climate change.

Other findings in the survey reveal:

Almost half of the public (48%) said that climate change is either entirely (15%) or mainly (33%) caused by human activity, the highest level recorded since the survey started.

And despite recent evidence that it is what we eat which has the biggest impact on the planet, more than half of those surveyed (56%) said they thought choosing to walk, cycle or use public transport more instead of using a car was the single biggest change they could make.

People were most likely to trust scientists working at universities (84%) and scientific organisations (83%) to provide accurate information about climate change. Levels of trust were lowest for social media (17%).

And good news for Pure Planet as more people than ever before are choosing to switch energy providers, as well as more support for renewable energy.

Those in favour of renewable energy increased from 77% in December 2018 to 84%
in March 2019.

And 20% of people said they had switched energy supplier in the last year, and increase of 15% from March 2016 and the highest level since the survey started in March 2012.

You can check out the full survey findings here.

Good to see that more people are taking climate change seriously. Apparently of the 2,000 people who took part, two per cent said that did not believe climate change existed. That’s 40 people! Are you one of them?! 😂

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Userlevel 7
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Good news but...armoured suit at the ready...
"Being concerned" with climate change is not the same as people willingly accepting the "pain" inflicted by governmental actions which will be considered necessary to address it.
Changing energy supplier to a greener supplier is relatively pain free (for most), but driving fewer miles in fossil fuelled cars, or flying less frequently, or more expensive or different packaging/food etc. (add your own thing) are harder sells.

​Nonetheless it's encouraging.
Userlevel 7
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Only purchase meat from a good source and avoid farmed fish.
If all the above cheap sources where removed, prices would go up and although unfair for many it would be sustainable. Less gross and less harmful to the planet.

Will large swathes of America, China and other devoloped countries radically change sooner rather than later. Can we rely on big business to do the right thing and how much influence is being applied by governments.

Are our local authorities really doing all they can.
All I hear is that there strapped for cash and no longer have the resources for this and that.
We are falling so short on recycling.
I guess one day all those refuse land fill sites will end up being a resource.

Why are'nt supermarkets acting swifter offering loose products and no packaging.
Thats a concentrated and contracted dilemma affecting many linked business.

I'll endeavour to be encouraged but there needs to be some serious momentum.
Strutt G;29153:

Why are'nt supermarkets acting swifter offering loose products and no packaging.
Thats a concentrated and contracted dilemma affecting many linked business.


You make some good points @Strutt G
On the subject of supermarkets' packaging, that winds me up too.
But what gets me even more angry is the amount of food being chucked away because it hasn't been sold. A friend of mine who used to work as a senior manager for a major supermarket brand explained it to me once.
They can't take the risk of not having fully stocked shelves. It's all about brand image.
Their fear is that if they get better at reducing waste by ordering only the amount of food that they'll sell (and they've got the data to do this) they may appear to be always running out because the shelves look emptier.
So it's all about how consumers interpret supermarket shelves which look emptier than we're used to. The supermarkets' fear is that the average consumer will say something like "Oh I never go to X anymore, they're always running out." And we prefer to go to Z instead because they're always fully stocked and whatever time we decide to go shopping.

So it's our fault! :mad:

Maybe if the food thrown away went on display???!
Userlevel 7
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Unfortunately lots and lots of consumers are just that "consumers", need it now now now... and are not switched on and thats what the supermarkets fear. Its just one massive ball of ignorance.

Just runs in line with a previous post I made about Waitrose knocking out those little sampling cups and I flagged that up.
The marketing dud (sorry left the e off) responded, very articulated, no doubt well educated and spouted on what they are doing in numbers terms. I said so the plastic tasting cups are a great example to the public then...you are full of contractictions and is there a degree for that knowledge.

Sorry but theres not much wisdom about and lots of examples of dumb intelligence.
Wheres theres a way of reducing waste it should be taken, I see no excuse for that and I need to change my habits.

*******
This is a response from a nice and friendly supplier with a really great product, but plastic pots.
It is something we have been very conscious of for some time and we share your concern.
At the the moment, our pots are recycled by quite a few local authorities which is a start.
We are looking at possibilities for compostable packaging, but the technology and options (especially for chilled yogurts) are in their infancy.
Like you we care about the environment and would hope that we can be better able to impact on this in the future.

*******
So it sounds in technical terms theirs lots to be done and was asked if I would accept the shorter shelf life and I said I could see no issues.

Plus I have to criticise my self because I have too many sneakers etc and that makes me dumb too.

NB:
I have a friend in France who lives in a village and knows the local refuse chap.
He collects the dumped out of date food from the local supermarket and delivers it his neighbours.
When I was there he delivered smoked salmon and some veg one day old etc.
Nothing like the Euro rules that we follow....I could go on
Strutt G;29243:
We are looking at possibilities for compostable packaging, but the technology and options (especially for chilled yogurts) are in their infancy.
Like you we care about the environment and would hope that we can be better able to impact on this in the future.

*******
So it sounds in technical terms theirs lots to be done and was asked if I would accept the shorter shelf life and I said I could see no issues.


I didn't realise shops were considering that, that's pretty interesting! So would that be a shorter shelf life if they had compostable packaging?
That could actually be a good thing to help minimise food waste, shorter shelf life = people have to only buy food they'll eat, versus long shelf life = buy extra food = forgetting about it in the back of the fridge!

RE France I think they're quite strict on food waste - supermarkets are banned by law from throwing away/destroying extra food and have to donate it to food banks and charities instead :raisinghands:

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