• I pointed out that their supplier only generated 20 percent of its own electric, leaving 80, the vast majority, being regos too. I also mentioned the fact if I switched to their supplier it would cost me £700 a year more. I suggested the more demand there is for clean energy the better and pure planet helps less affluent people see it as a realistic alternative so can only be good They haven't replied 😂
    1
  • I pointed out that their supplier only generated 20 percent of its own electric, leaving 80, the vast majority, being regos too. I also mentioned the fact if I switched to their supplier it would cost me £700 a year more. I suggested the more demand there is for clean energy the better and pure planet helps less affluent people see it as a realistic alternative so can only be good They haven't replied 😂
  • hi Geo
    May I ask, are you a PP customer?
    Do you have a list of companies which you would personally deem acceptable?

    Quote Originally Posted by Geoheated View Post
    As we all agree the system of allowing this practice is flawed. We can’t accept the any business should profit from a flawed system.

    People are being mis-informed and the advertising of where your energy was sourced is simply not true.

    Companies do operate morally and invest your energy fees into the sources claimed. And your suggestion to move to them is respectable.
    0
  • hi Geo
    May I ask, are you a PP customer?
    Do you have a list of companies which you would personally deem acceptable?

    Quote Originally Posted by Geoheated View Post
    As we all agree the system of allowing this practice is flawed. We can’t accept the any business should profit from a flawed system.

    People are being mis-informed and the advertising of where your energy was sourced is simply not true.

    Companies do operate morally and invest your energy fees into the sources claimed. And your suggestion to move to them is respectable.
  • It's all getting a bit brexitty if you ask me...
    Quote Originally Posted by JennyR68 View Post
    I pointed out that their supplier only generated 20 percent of its own electric, leaving 80, the vast majority, being regos too. I also mentioned the fact if I switched to their supplier it would cost me £700 a year more. I suggested the more demand there is for clean energy the better and pure planet helps less affluent people see it as a realistic alternative so can only be good They haven't replied ������
    0
  • It's all getting a bit brexitty if you ask me...
    Quote Originally Posted by JennyR68 View Post
    I pointed out that their supplier only generated 20 percent of its own electric, leaving 80, the vast majority, being regos too. I also mentioned the fact if I switched to their supplier it would cost me £700 a year more. I suggested the more demand there is for clean energy the better and pure planet helps less affluent people see it as a realistic alternative so can only be good They haven't replied ������
  • Forgive me, I've not read all the posts on here, but a number of the ones I have leads me to believe that some customers have no understanding of how the National Grid works.

    So let me put this as simply as at least I understand it.

    I'm a Pure Planet customer.
    I pay Pure Planet for 'renewable' or 'green' energy.

    This does not, and I cannot emphasise this enough, does not, meant that I 'get green energy' from Pure Planet.

    It means that I pay Pure Planet to source and buy 'green energy' on my behalf, which either will be, or has been, inputted into the National Grid.

    If anyone here wants, 'green energy' that specifically comes to your house - buy solar panels, a ground-source heat pump, or some other non-grid system.

    No company that claims to sell you 'green energy' can guarantee you that you will receive that energy, the only thing they can guarantee is that they will either generate it on your behalf, or buy it from someone else who generates it on your behalf.

    I'm sorry if this has 'burst your bubble' but that is the way the National Grid works, everything generated goes into the grid, then it comes back from the grid, there's no way, even if the company generates the electricity itself, to 100% know exactly where it's gone after it enters the grid, other than possibly the rough locality of where it is generated.
    Last edited by Gwyndy; 01-10-19 at 11:19.
    6
  • Forgive me, I've not read all the posts on here, but a number of the ones I have leads me to believe that some customers have no understanding of how the National Grid works.

    So let me put this as simply as at least I understand it.

    I'm a Pure Planet customer.
    I pay Pure Planet for 'renewable' or 'green' energy.

    This does not, and I cannot emphasise this enough, does not, meant that I 'get green energy' from Pure Planet.

    It means that I pay Pure Planet to source and buy 'green energy' on my behalf, which either will be, or has been, inputted into the National Grid.

    If anyone here wants, 'green energy' that specifically comes to your house - buy solar panels, a ground-source heat pump, or some other non-grid system.

    No company that claims to sell you 'green energy' can guarantee you that you will receive that energy, the only thing they can guarantee is that they will either generate it on your behalf, or buy it from someone else who generates it on your behalf.

    I'm sorry if this has 'burst your bubble' but that is the way the National Grid works, everything generated goes into the grid, then it comes back from the grid, there's no way, even if the company generates the electricity itself, to 100% know exactly where it's gone after it enters the grid, other than possibly the rough locality of where it is generated.
  • Quote Originally Posted by JennyR68 View Post
    I'm getting told off on a FB page for not supporting a company that invests in the supply structure in this country. What do I say in reply?
    Hi jenny. How about this.
    PP are 24% owned by BP. (i think its 24 but it may of changed).
    BP via subsidiary companies like lightsourcebp are one of the biggest producers of renewable energy in the world and the largest in europe, so in fact they do own and produce their own generation plants using solar and wind.
    1
  • Quote Originally Posted by JennyR68 View Post
    I'm getting told off on a FB page for not supporting a company that invests in the supply structure in this country. What do I say in reply?
    Hi jenny. How about this.
    PP are 24% owned by BP. (i think its 24 but it may of changed).
    BP via subsidiary companies like lightsourcebp are one of the biggest producers of renewable energy in the world and the largest in europe, so in fact they do own and produce their own generation plants using solar and wind.
  • Quote Originally Posted by Jon1 View Post
    Hi jenny. How about this.
    PP are 24% owned by BP. (i think its 24 but it may of changed).
    BP via subsidiary companies like lightsourcebp are one of the biggest producers of renewable energy in the world and the largest in europe, so in fact they do own and produce their own generation plants using solar and wind.
    Nice one, where do I find facts like that out?
    0
  • Quote Originally Posted by Jon1 View Post
    Hi jenny. How about this.
    PP are 24% owned by BP. (i think its 24 but it may of changed).
    BP via subsidiary companies like lightsourcebp are one of the biggest producers of renewable energy in the world and the largest in europe, so in fact they do own and produce their own generation plants using solar and wind.
    Nice one, where do I find facts like that out?
  • Google lightsourebp.
    0
  • Google lightsourebp.
  • Quote Originally Posted by Gwyndy View Post
    Forgive me, I've not read all the posts on here, but a number of the ones I have leads me to believe that some customers have no understanding of how the National Grid works.

    So let me put this as simply as at least I understand it.

    I'm a Pure Planet customer.
    I pay Pure Planet for 'renewable' or 'green' energy.

    This does not, and I cannot emphasise this enough, does not, meant that I 'get green energy' from Pure Planet.

    It means that I pay Pure Planet to source and buy 'green energy' on my behalf, which either will be, or has been, inputted into the National Grid.

    If anyone here wants, 'green energy' that specifically comes to your house - buy solar panels, a ground-source heat pump, or some other non-grid system.

    No company that claims to sell you 'green energy' can guarantee you that you will receive that energy, the only thing they can guarantee is that they will either generate it on your behalf, or buy it from someone else who generates it on your behalf.

    I'm sorry if this has 'burst your bubble' but that is the way the National Grid works, everything generated goes into the grid, then it comes back from the grid, there's no way, even if the company generates the electricity itself, to 100% know exactly where it's gone after it enters the grid, other than possibly the rough locality of where it is generated.
    Hi,

    I don’t see anyone here with a low enough intelligence to honestly think that the energy provider routes the green electrons from a wind turbine to your house.

    Yes, we all agree that when paying for green energy we expect the provider to source the energy from a renewable source.

    That means we are invested in supporting renewables.

    Why else would we buy green energy other than to have it sourced from renewable generators.

    The issue raised here and by many now is that these suppliers don’t source the energy from those generators. They source it from the same place that every other supplier gets it, the wholesale market.

    So what have we achieved by paying into the renewable supplier?
    They have sourced certificates that say someone else paid for renewable energy at a time that suited them (when it was cheaper than brown).

    This practice does not support the growth of renewables. It’s just a marketing ploy to allow them to claim 100% renewable sourced energy, without actually sourcing it.

    The big question: If you didn’t pay into PP or such, would that renewable energy have been generated anyway? Sadly yes, you have not funded renewables. You have not purchased renewable energy. You paid for a certificate that was left over from existing renewables already generated in the past.

    There are better ways to do this. Companies that do purchase your energy as promoted. And as many have suggested here, the current system is flawed and being exploited as a business model by allowing the sale of green certificates without purchasing the energy associated with it.

    I hope the transparency of the industry improves to allow us consumers to differentiate between buying 100% renewable sourced energy and buying standard energy with a cheap certificate of prior existence, surplace to requirement of the previous purchased of that energy as they do not need to claim the green credentials to their customers.

    And the argument that you can’t buy energy from renewables when they are not producing is nonsense. As consumers currently we don’t have time of use tariffs so our suppliers aren’t having to purchase renewables as you use energy. They can negotiate directly with the generators and purchase a sum of energy to be put into the grid to balance your use. As other suppliers, pointed out by the latest which? report, do so.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by woz View Post
    hi Geo
    May I ask, are you a PP customer?
    Do you have a list of companies which you would personally deem acceptable?
    Hi,

    I was a customer for 2 years. So heavily invested here.

    I would go by the Which? Report of those who buy energy from the generators as promised when selling it as “100% sourced”.

    https://press.which.co.uk/whichpress...rgy-suppliers/
    Last edited by Geoheated; 08-10-19 at 23:08. Reason: Typo
    0
  • Quote Originally Posted by Gwyndy View Post
    Forgive me, I've not read all the posts on here, but a number of the ones I have leads me to believe that some customers have no understanding of how the National Grid works.

    So let me put this as simply as at least I understand it.

    I'm a Pure Planet customer.
    I pay Pure Planet for 'renewable' or 'green' energy.

    This does not, and I cannot emphasise this enough, does not, meant that I 'get green energy' from Pure Planet.

    It means that I pay Pure Planet to source and buy 'green energy' on my behalf, which either will be, or has been, inputted into the National Grid.

    If anyone here wants, 'green energy' that specifically comes to your house - buy solar panels, a ground-source heat pump, or some other non-grid system.

    No company that claims to sell you 'green energy' can guarantee you that you will receive that energy, the only thing they can guarantee is that they will either generate it on your behalf, or buy it from someone else who generates it on your behalf.

    I'm sorry if this has 'burst your bubble' but that is the way the National Grid works, everything generated goes into the grid, then it comes back from the grid, there's no way, even if the company generates the electricity itself, to 100% know exactly where it's gone after it enters the grid, other than possibly the rough locality of where it is generated.
    Hi,

    I don’t see anyone here with a low enough intelligence to honestly think that the energy provider routes the green electrons from a wind turbine to your house.

    Yes, we all agree that when paying for green energy we expect the provider to source the energy from a renewable source.

    That means we are invested in supporting renewables.

    Why else would we buy green energy other than to have it sourced from renewable generators.

    The issue raised here and by many now is that these suppliers don’t source the energy from those generators. They source it from the same place that every other supplier gets it, the wholesale market.

    So what have we achieved by paying into the renewable supplier?
    They have sourced certificates that say someone else paid for renewable energy at a time that suited them (when it was cheaper than brown).

    This practice does not support the growth of renewables. It’s just a marketing ploy to allow them to claim 100% renewable sourced energy, without actually sourcing it.

    The big question: If you didn’t pay into PP or such, would that renewable energy have been generated anyway? Sadly yes, you have not funded renewables. You have not purchased renewable energy. You paid for a certificate that was left over from existing renewables already generated in the past.

    There are better ways to do this. Companies that do purchase your energy as promoted. And as many have suggested here, the current system is flawed and being exploited as a business model by allowing the sale of green certificates without purchasing the energy associated with it.

    I hope the transparency of the industry improves to allow us consumers to differentiate between buying 100% renewable sourced energy and buying standard energy with a cheap certificate of prior existence, surplace to requirement of the previous purchased of that energy as they do not need to claim the green credentials to their customers.

    And the argument that you can’t buy energy from renewables when they are not producing is nonsense. As consumers currently we don’t have time of use tariffs so our suppliers aren’t having to purchase renewables as you use energy. They can negotiate directly with the generators and purchase a sum of energy to be put into the grid to balance your use. As other suppliers, pointed out by the latest which? report, do so.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by woz View Post
    hi Geo
    May I ask, are you a PP customer?
    Do you have a list of companies which you would personally deem acceptable?
    Hi,

    I was a customer for 2 years. So heavily invested here.

    I would go by the Which? Report of those who buy energy from the generators as promised when selling it as “100% sourced”.

    https://press.which.co.uk/whichpress...rgy-suppliers/
  • An example of sourcing energy from generators and not the wholesale market:

    https://inews.co.uk/news/uk-universi...-change-647782
    0
  • An example of sourcing energy from generators and not the wholesale market:

    https://inews.co.uk/news/uk-universi...-change-647782
  • hi geo
    to be clear, because that wasn't really an answer to the question I asked, you'd endorse buying from the windfarms directly, or if PP bought from the windfarms?
    What happens when the renewable sources can't supply the quantity of energy PP are supplying to their customers? Is it then OK to top it up with renewable certificated energy?
    Quote Originally Posted by Geoheated View Post
    An example of sourcing energy from generators and not the wholesale market:

    https://inews.co.uk/news/uk-universi...-change-647782
    0
  • hi geo
    to be clear, because that wasn't really an answer to the question I asked, you'd endorse buying from the windfarms directly, or if PP bought from the windfarms?
    What happens when the renewable sources can't supply the quantity of energy PP are supplying to their customers? Is it then OK to top it up with renewable certificated energy?
    Quote Originally Posted by Geoheated View Post
    An example of sourcing energy from generators and not the wholesale market:

    https://inews.co.uk/news/uk-universi...-change-647782
  • Quote Originally Posted by woz View Post
    hi geo
    to be clear, because that wasn't really an answer to the question I asked, you'd endorse buying from the windfarms directly, or if PP bought from the windfarms?
    What happens when the renewable sources can't supply the quantity of energy PP are supplying to their customers? Is it then OK to top it up with renewable certificated energy?
    Correct. If a supplier claims 100% is sourced from wind, solar, etc. Then they should actually source it from those generators. Some companies are doing that, as you can see in the table published by the Which investigation.

    So if they can do it, so can others.

    Why dont all of those on the list do it? Well its not cheaper to source all of your energy from renewables yet.

    As you pointed out a few times. The Ofgem system is "Flawed" in its allowing certificates of renewable energy already produced and sold to then be re-sold as a certificate alone. That certificate then being used to sell wholesale sourced energy as 100% renewable.

    Does anyone really believe that startup companies can sell 100% renewable energy cheaper than the big energy corporations?
    If it seems too good to be true, it is. And this is the case. Cheap energy with cheap un-claimed certificates does not support renewable generation or growth.

    Why do you buy 100% renewable energy?
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    0
  • Quote Originally Posted by woz View Post
    hi geo
    to be clear, because that wasn't really an answer to the question I asked, you'd endorse buying from the windfarms directly, or if PP bought from the windfarms?
    What happens when the renewable sources can't supply the quantity of energy PP are supplying to their customers? Is it then OK to top it up with renewable certificated energy?
    Correct. If a supplier claims 100% is sourced from wind, solar, etc. Then they should actually source it from those generators. Some companies are doing that, as you can see in the table published by the Which investigation.

    So if they can do it, so can others.

    Why dont all of those on the list do it? Well its not cheaper to source all of your energy from renewables yet.

    As you pointed out a few times. The Ofgem system is "Flawed" in its allowing certificates of renewable energy already produced and sold to then be re-sold as a certificate alone. That certificate then being used to sell wholesale sourced energy as 100% renewable.

    Does anyone really believe that startup companies can sell 100% renewable energy cheaper than the big energy corporations?
    If it seems too good to be true, it is. And this is the case. Cheap energy with cheap un-claimed certificates does not support renewable generation or growth.

    Why do you buy 100% renewable energy?
    Attached Images Attached Images