• Zero Hero top tips and tricks to sustainable living

    Hi everyone,

    As part of our campaign to celebrate our Zero Heroes (that's all our amazing Members, who are helping us reach zero carbon emissions!), we've started sharing a #SustainableTipOfTheWeek.

    On the Community there are lots of Members already taking simple but amazing steps to reduce their carbon footprint, like @schase switching to LEDs, @NannyOgg shopping sustainably or @Bev working her way to an increasingly vegan diet.

    It'd be great to share all your ideas, and we'll also share some of ours too!

    For example, in the office we've been collecting up our Hovis bread bags ready to drop off at a TerraCycle collection point.

    According to their website, these bags are then "shredded, washed and then pelletized. These pellets can be used for a number of molded rigid plastic products like benches, or used as film for products such as rubbish bags."

    The collection points gain credits for each 250g they send off, which can then be used to donate money to different charities.
    (as if we needed more justification to eat bread)

    Name:  IMG_4600.jpg
Views: 77
Size:  6.51 MB


    It doesn't have to be part of a scheme though - even using an outdoors clothes line to dry clothes (whenever the rain stops) instead of a washing machine can make a difference!

    If you have any ideas you'd like to share, you can add them below
    2
  • Hi everyone,

    As part of our campaign to celebrate our Zero Heroes (that's all our amazing Members, who are helping us reach zero carbon emissions!), we've started sharing a #SustainableTipOfTheWeek.

    On the Community there are lots of Members already taking simple but amazing steps to reduce their carbon footprint, like @schase switching to LEDs, @NannyOgg shopping sustainably or @Bev working her way to an increasingly vegan diet.

    It'd be great to share all your ideas, and we'll also share some of ours too!

    For example, in the office we've been collecting up our Hovis bread bags ready to drop off at a TerraCycle collection point.

    According to their website, these bags are then "shredded, washed and then pelletized. These pellets can be used for a number of molded rigid plastic products like benches, or used as film for products such as rubbish bags."

    The collection points gain credits for each 250g they send off, which can then be used to donate money to different charities.
    (as if we needed more justification to eat bread)

    Name:  IMG_4600.jpg
Views: 77
Size:  6.51 MB


    It doesn't have to be part of a scheme though - even using an outdoors clothes line to dry clothes (whenever the rain stops) instead of a washing machine can make a difference!

    If you have any ideas you'd like to share, you can add them below
  • Hi Nataly,
    I'm with you in the drying clothes on the line instead of using the tumble dryer, but I'm always getting complaints that the clothes especially towels are stiff or rough. They're just spoilt, but will have to put up with it, it's made quite a difference in my usage
    1
  • Hi Nataly,
    I'm with you in the drying clothes on the line instead of using the tumble dryer, but I'm always getting complaints that the clothes especially towels are stiff or rough. They're just spoilt, but will have to put up with it, it's made quite a difference in my usage
  • I presume you use fabric conditioner Duppy? Always makes a massive difference, and even if a wintry wet day, dry on indoor airer rather than tumbler 👍👍👍
    Peace is always beautiful.

    WALT WHITMAN
    1
  • I presume you use fabric conditioner Duppy? Always makes a massive difference, and even if a wintry wet day, dry on indoor airer rather than tumbler 👍👍👍
    Peace is always beautiful.

    WALT WHITMAN
  • Quote Originally Posted by Bev View Post
    I presume you use fabric conditioner Duppy? Always makes a massive difference, and even if a wintry wet day, dry on indoor airer rather than tumbler 👍👍👍
    Yes Bev, I/we use comfort mainly.
    The amount of laundry that gets done I would need an airer in every room. I try to tell them that the towels are an excellent exfoliant, but their not impressed
    1
  • Quote Originally Posted by Bev View Post
    I presume you use fabric conditioner Duppy? Always makes a massive difference, and even if a wintry wet day, dry on indoor airer rather than tumbler 👍👍👍
    Yes Bev, I/we use comfort mainly.
    The amount of laundry that gets done I would need an airer in every room. I try to tell them that the towels are an excellent exfoliant, but their not impressed
  • Quote Originally Posted by Duppy View Post
    Yes Bev, I/we use comfort mainly.
    The amount of laundry that gets done I would need an airer in every room. I try to tell them that the towels are an excellent exfoliant, but their not impressed
    I like the creativity

    Hanging up clothes to dry means less need to iron them too...
    1
  • Quote Originally Posted by Duppy View Post
    Yes Bev, I/we use comfort mainly.
    The amount of laundry that gets done I would need an airer in every room. I try to tell them that the towels are an excellent exfoliant, but their not impressed
    I like the creativity

    Hanging up clothes to dry means less need to iron them too...
  • One of our PP team members, Hannah, came in today rocking some cool new Converse - and they're made from 11 plastic bottles!

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Views: 23
Size:  1.40 MB


    A great tip is to look out for clothing made from recycled material, especially as it becomes more popular and easily accessible!

    "Once they’ve [the plastic bottles] been ground down into flakes, the material is spun out and this creates a recycled polyester material. The signature Regrind outsole is made and the finishing touches are applied. The classic Converse patch stays -but the metal eyelets have been ditched in favour of a stitched alternative."

    There's more info here

    Community member @NannyOgg just recently bought her 9 year old a hat made from recycled bottles, and it was only £4 so it looks like this may be the fashion of the future!
    2
  • One of our PP team members, Hannah, came in today rocking some cool new Converse - and they're made from 11 plastic bottles!

    Name:  recycled converse.jpg
Views: 23
Size:  1.40 MB


    A great tip is to look out for clothing made from recycled material, especially as it becomes more popular and easily accessible!

    "Once they’ve [the plastic bottles] been ground down into flakes, the material is spun out and this creates a recycled polyester material. The signature Regrind outsole is made and the finishing touches are applied. The classic Converse patch stays -but the metal eyelets have been ditched in favour of a stitched alternative."

    There's more info here

    Community member @NannyOgg just recently bought her 9 year old a hat made from recycled bottles, and it was only £4 so it looks like this may be the fashion of the future!
  • Thanks for the Mention @Nataly. It was purely by accident so a top buy and he loves it. No gimmicky characters or top brands, just a plain old functional hat to keep his head warm. He loved the idea of recycled.

    Community member @NannyOgg just recently bought her 9 year old a hat made from recycled bottles, and it was only £4 so it looks like this may be the fashion of the future![/QUOTE]
    1
  • Thanks for the Mention @Nataly. It was purely by accident so a top buy and he loves it. No gimmicky characters or top brands, just a plain old functional hat to keep his head warm. He loved the idea of recycled.

    Community member @NannyOgg just recently bought her 9 year old a hat made from recycled bottles, and it was only £4 so it looks like this may be the fashion of the future![/QUOTE]
  • For the last 7 years, we’ve been using a pulley maid ceiling dryer. Never had an issue, even though we are a household of 4. No extra heating energy required, no blocked radiators, and fully in keeping with the period during which our house was built :-)

    When we replaced our washing machine, we invested in a 1600rpm A+++ one, and after a cycle we might give it an extra spin to remove a further 20-30% water to speed up the drying process when required.

    ​To complete the picture, I’d draw your attention to the statement prop: a 35-40 year-old (vintage?) beach towel from Greenpeace, and an 8w low-energy lightbulb Name:  A6265FD5-B026-4E92-AAC5-4D2742C9ED7A.jpeg
Views: 25
Size:  76.9 KB...
    5
  • For the last 7 years, we’ve been using a pulley maid ceiling dryer. Never had an issue, even though we are a household of 4. No extra heating energy required, no blocked radiators, and fully in keeping with the period during which our house was built :-)

    When we replaced our washing machine, we invested in a 1600rpm A+++ one, and after a cycle we might give it an extra spin to remove a further 20-30% water to speed up the drying process when required.

    ​To complete the picture, I’d draw your attention to the statement prop: a 35-40 year-old (vintage?) beach towel from Greenpeace, and an 8w low-energy lightbulb Name:  A6265FD5-B026-4E92-AAC5-4D2742C9ED7A.jpeg
Views: 25
Size:  76.9 KB...
  • Quote Originally Posted by DutchCaerleon View Post
    For the last 7 years, we’ve been using a pulley maid ceiling dryer. Never had an issue, even though we are a household of 4. No extra heating energy required, no blocked radiators, and fully in keeping with the period during which our house was built :-)

    When we replaced our washing machine, we invested in a 1600rpm A+++ one, and after a cycle we might give it an extra spin to remove a further 20-30% water to speed up the drying process when required.

    ​To complete the picture, I’d draw your attention to the statement prop: a 35-40 year-old (vintage?) beach towel from Greenpeace, and an 8w low-energy lightbulb Name:  A6265FD5-B026-4E92-AAC5-4D2742C9ED7A.jpeg
Views: 25
Size:  76.9 KB...
    Wow, it's a long time since I have seen one of them, unfortunately most ceilings these days are too low to use one of these.
    Well done for keeping the original features.
    1
  • Quote Originally Posted by DutchCaerleon View Post
    For the last 7 years, we’ve been using a pulley maid ceiling dryer. Never had an issue, even though we are a household of 4. No extra heating energy required, no blocked radiators, and fully in keeping with the period during which our house was built :-)

    When we replaced our washing machine, we invested in a 1600rpm A+++ one, and after a cycle we might give it an extra spin to remove a further 20-30% water to speed up the drying process when required.

    ​To complete the picture, I’d draw your attention to the statement prop: a 35-40 year-old (vintage?) beach towel from Greenpeace, and an 8w low-energy lightbulb Name:  A6265FD5-B026-4E92-AAC5-4D2742C9ED7A.jpeg
Views: 25
Size:  76.9 KB...
    Wow, it's a long time since I have seen one of them, unfortunately most ceilings these days are too low to use one of these.
    Well done for keeping the original features.
  • Even though I’m 6ft tall, the ceiling dryer doesn’t bother me or gets in the way very often...

    I am surprised how our Edwardian place has got higher ceilings than most more recently built houses. Even though British people grew taller in the last century (men’s average height increased by 4 inches; women’s height increased by 1.5 inches) over the past century, houses seem to have lower ceilings ...
    1
  • Even though I’m 6ft tall, the ceiling dryer doesn’t bother me or gets in the way very often...

    I am surprised how our Edwardian place has got higher ceilings than most more recently built houses. Even though British people grew taller in the last century (men’s average height increased by 4 inches; women’s height increased by 1.5 inches) over the past century, houses seem to have lower ceilings ...