• Leased EV Running Costs

    It seems that every new EV release is accompanied by some fairly impressive improvements, particularly in battery performance. For example “the new Renault Zoe has taken advantage of denser cells to increase the ZOE’s battery capacity from 41kWh to 52kWh without physically increasing its size. The result is an all electric range that rises from 186 miles to 242 miles - an increase of around 30 per cent” (Auto Express review). It also has introduced a fast charge capability.

    No wonder EV leasing is popular, as it would avoid getting stuck with old technology. It is reminiscent of the early days of mobile phones when contracts enabled consumers to acquire a new model every couple of years. Some day outright purchase of an EV will make better sense, just as savvy mobile users are ditching contracts and getting SIM only deals for their current mobile.

    So it would be very interesting to know the real life leasing costs of running an EV?

    Would anyone like to share the cost/mile over the lifetime of their lease? It would be helpful to state what is included (e.g. insurance, servicing, breakdown cover etc.) to enable comparisons to be made.
    1
  • It seems that every new EV release is accompanied by some fairly impressive improvements, particularly in battery performance. For example “the new Renault Zoe has taken advantage of denser cells to increase the ZOE’s battery capacity from 41kWh to 52kWh without physically increasing its size. The result is an all electric range that rises from 186 miles to 242 miles - an increase of around 30 per cent” (Auto Express review). It also has introduced a fast charge capability.

    No wonder EV leasing is popular, as it would avoid getting stuck with old technology. It is reminiscent of the early days of mobile phones when contracts enabled consumers to acquire a new model every couple of years. Some day outright purchase of an EV will make better sense, just as savvy mobile users are ditching contracts and getting SIM only deals for their current mobile.

    So it would be very interesting to know the real life leasing costs of running an EV?

    Would anyone like to share the cost/mile over the lifetime of their lease? It would be helpful to state what is included (e.g. insurance, servicing, breakdown cover etc.) to enable comparisons to be made.
  • Hi @Lenny
    I'm leasing my Leaf via work.
    The lease is through a company called Tusker.
    I'm paying approx £450 per month over 4 years. So total is just over £21k for a new car which otherwise would have cost me £30k.
    But! Included in my £450 per month is insurance, servicing, breakdown cover from Tusker, and there's no road tax.
    I'm paying about £50 a month to run it, compared with about £250 in my previous car (which was a petrol Honda CR-V).
    And as it's a work lease I'm also getting a salary sacrifice tax benefit.

    I did 'the math' before and basically I'm breaking out at about even. And the other thing is that it's clean!

    I like your analogy of the early days of smartphones. That's why I went for the lease option. If I had to try and sell the 2018 Leaf in 2023 I reckon I'd struggle because the technology will have advanced so much.

    Hope that helps?
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    1
  • Hi @Lenny
    I'm leasing my Leaf via work.
    The lease is through a company called Tusker.
    I'm paying approx £450 per month over 4 years. So total is just over £21k for a new car which otherwise would have cost me £30k.
    But! Included in my £450 per month is insurance, servicing, breakdown cover from Tusker, and there's no road tax.
    I'm paying about £50 a month to run it, compared with about £250 in my previous car (which was a petrol Honda CR-V).
    And as it's a work lease I'm also getting a salary sacrifice tax benefit.

    I did 'the math' before and basically I'm breaking out at about even. And the other thing is that it's clean!

    I like your analogy of the early days of smartphones. That's why I went for the lease option. If I had to try and sell the 2018 Leaf in 2023 I reckon I'd struggle because the technology will have advanced so much.

    Hope that helps?
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • Hello @Marc,

    Thanks for that - what would you say was your typical annual mileage? Looks quite high from your monthly fuel costs?

    It would be interesting to get a £/mile figure.
    0
  • Hello @Marc,

    Thanks for that - what would you say was your typical annual mileage? Looks quite high from your monthly fuel costs?

    It would be interesting to get a £/mile figure.
  • Quote Originally Posted by Lenny View Post
    what would you say was your typical annual mileage? Looks quite high from your monthly fuel costs?

    It would be interesting to get a £/mile figure.
    Hi @Lenny under the terms of my lease I'm capped at 10,000 miles a year. I can get that raised for year 2 but that'll also increase the monthly payments, to what I'm not sure yet. SO far I've done just over 4,000 and I'm much more mindful of my mileage than I was in the old banger, where I was regularly doing 15,000 a year.
    The last time I checked I'm paying about 4p per mile. I know other Leaf owners who are 'better' drivers and who are getting closer to 5p. Driving style, types of roads and weather conditions do make a difference.
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    2
  • Quote Originally Posted by Lenny View Post
    what would you say was your typical annual mileage? Looks quite high from your monthly fuel costs?

    It would be interesting to get a £/mile figure.
    Hi @Lenny under the terms of my lease I'm capped at 10,000 miles a year. I can get that raised for year 2 but that'll also increase the monthly payments, to what I'm not sure yet. SO far I've done just over 4,000 and I'm much more mindful of my mileage than I was in the old banger, where I was regularly doing 15,000 a year.
    The last time I checked I'm paying about 4p per mile. I know other Leaf owners who are 'better' drivers and who are getting closer to 5p. Driving style, types of roads and weather conditions do make a difference.
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • V Interesting figures. How many miles do you do, 900 a month? How much kWh does the car use per month?

    No one can predict accurately what the future will hold, but I hazard a guess that it won’t be 2018 technology that will turn potential buyers off; it’s the remaining battery warranty period and financing options for battery replacement that may cause potential buyers to do some head scratching.

    A friend who’s a car dealer suggested to me a few weeks ago that for a £40k bev car, battery replacement could be £25-30k, and they’ll last maybe 7 years, so big outlays. There will be most likely be a shortage of secondhand bev’s, and I am not sure if there’s enough power in the grid to charge all these cars, vans and buses.

    The next 5 years will be chaos in terms of car ownership... limited no. of people will want to buy a secondhand diesel, and they’ll depreciate v quickly; cost of petrol cars (secondhand and new) will go up due to increased demand, but torq in newbought cars will be reduced due to reduced engine capacity, so spare a thought for those with horse trailers or caravans to pull.

    As an aside, but I was wondering if you could’ve converted the CR-V to LPG, cut harmful emissions and reduced your fuel bill with £1k/a or £3.5-4K over 4 years based on 10.8k mileage with a 27mpg petrol CRV... (Not the most fashionable suggestion, I admit, but I could’ve had £10k more in savings driving exactly the same car had I done it)



    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Hi @Lenny
    I'm leasing my Leaf via work.
    The lease is through a company called Tusker.
    I'm paying approx £450 per month over 4 years. So total is just over £21k for a new car which otherwise would have cost me £30k.
    But! Included in my £450 per month is insurance, servicing, breakdown cover from Tusker, and there's no road tax.
    I'm paying about £50 a month to run it, compared with about £250 in my previous car (which was a petrol Honda CR-V).
    And as it's a work lease I'm also getting a salary sacrifice tax benefit.

    I did 'the math' before and basically I'm breaking out at about even. And the other thing is that it's clean!

    I like your analogy of the early days of smartphones. That's why I went for the lease option. If I had to try and sell the 2018 Leaf in 2023 I reckon I'd struggle because the technology will have advanced so much.

    Hope that helps?
    1
  • V Interesting figures. How many miles do you do, 900 a month? How much kWh does the car use per month?

    No one can predict accurately what the future will hold, but I hazard a guess that it won’t be 2018 technology that will turn potential buyers off; it’s the remaining battery warranty period and financing options for battery replacement that may cause potential buyers to do some head scratching.

    A friend who’s a car dealer suggested to me a few weeks ago that for a £40k bev car, battery replacement could be £25-30k, and they’ll last maybe 7 years, so big outlays. There will be most likely be a shortage of secondhand bev’s, and I am not sure if there’s enough power in the grid to charge all these cars, vans and buses.

    The next 5 years will be chaos in terms of car ownership... limited no. of people will want to buy a secondhand diesel, and they’ll depreciate v quickly; cost of petrol cars (secondhand and new) will go up due to increased demand, but torq in newbought cars will be reduced due to reduced engine capacity, so spare a thought for those with horse trailers or caravans to pull.

    As an aside, but I was wondering if you could’ve converted the CR-V to LPG, cut harmful emissions and reduced your fuel bill with £1k/a or £3.5-4K over 4 years based on 10.8k mileage with a 27mpg petrol CRV... (Not the most fashionable suggestion, I admit, but I could’ve had £10k more in savings driving exactly the same car had I done it)



    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Hi @Lenny
    I'm leasing my Leaf via work.
    The lease is through a company called Tusker.
    I'm paying approx £450 per month over 4 years. So total is just over £21k for a new car which otherwise would have cost me £30k.
    But! Included in my £450 per month is insurance, servicing, breakdown cover from Tusker, and there's no road tax.
    I'm paying about £50 a month to run it, compared with about £250 in my previous car (which was a petrol Honda CR-V).
    And as it's a work lease I'm also getting a salary sacrifice tax benefit.

    I did 'the math' before and basically I'm breaking out at about even. And the other thing is that it's clean!

    I like your analogy of the early days of smartphones. That's why I went for the lease option. If I had to try and sell the 2018 Leaf in 2023 I reckon I'd struggle because the technology will have advanced so much.

    Hope that helps?
  • Quote Originally Posted by DutchCaerleon View Post
    As an aside, but I was wondering if you could’ve converted the CR-V to LPG, cut harmful emissions and reduced your fuel bill with £1k/a or £3.5-4K over 4 years based on 10.8k mileage with a 27mpg petrol CRV... (Not the most fashionable suggestion, I admit, but I could’ve had £10k more in savings driving exactly the same car had I done it)

    My son had his 1968 Beetle converted to LPG after he restored it and I had a 1971 VW Type 2 Camper which was also converted. Both vehicles ran extremely well on LPG, the spark plugs in particular looked like new after 10,000 miles and the savings in fuel costs paid for the conversions in little over 1 year.

    The LPG era for vehicles seems to have come and gone? A shame really as it could prove a useful 'gateway' fuel on the road to fully renewable.
    2
  • Quote Originally Posted by DutchCaerleon View Post
    As an aside, but I was wondering if you could’ve converted the CR-V to LPG, cut harmful emissions and reduced your fuel bill with £1k/a or £3.5-4K over 4 years based on 10.8k mileage with a 27mpg petrol CRV... (Not the most fashionable suggestion, I admit, but I could’ve had £10k more in savings driving exactly the same car had I done it)

    My son had his 1968 Beetle converted to LPG after he restored it and I had a 1971 VW Type 2 Camper which was also converted. Both vehicles ran extremely well on LPG, the spark plugs in particular looked like new after 10,000 miles and the savings in fuel costs paid for the conversions in little over 1 year.

    The LPG era for vehicles seems to have come and gone? A shame really as it could prove a useful 'gateway' fuel on the road to fully renewable.
  • hi Marc
    It's hard to know what figures to believe when you trawl the internet looking for miles/kWh figures for EV's.
    I'd sooner believe someone (like you) who has one and does some real world driving.
    I've seen figures ranging from about 3.3 to 4 miles per kWh quoted, which at 14p/kwh equates to between about 3.5 to 4.25 pence per mile.
    4p seems about right.
    (to compare My I.C.E. powered car ranges from 33mpg cold winter short journeys to 45 mpg warm longer journeys so anywhere between 17 and 13p/mile

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Hi @Lenny under the terms of my lease I'm capped at 10,000 miles a year. I can get that raised for year 2 but that'll also increase the monthly payments, to what I'm not sure yet. SO far I've done just over 4,000 and I'm much more mindful of my mileage than I was in the old banger, where I was regularly doing 15,000 a year.
    The last time I checked I'm paying about 4p per mile. I know other Leaf owners who are 'better' drivers and who are getting closer to 5p. Driving style, types of roads and weather conditions do make a difference.
    0
  • hi Marc
    It's hard to know what figures to believe when you trawl the internet looking for miles/kWh figures for EV's.
    I'd sooner believe someone (like you) who has one and does some real world driving.
    I've seen figures ranging from about 3.3 to 4 miles per kWh quoted, which at 14p/kwh equates to between about 3.5 to 4.25 pence per mile.
    4p seems about right.
    (to compare My I.C.E. powered car ranges from 33mpg cold winter short journeys to 45 mpg warm longer journeys so anywhere between 17 and 13p/mile

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Hi @Lenny under the terms of my lease I'm capped at 10,000 miles a year. I can get that raised for year 2 but that'll also increase the monthly payments, to what I'm not sure yet. SO far I've done just over 4,000 and I'm much more mindful of my mileage than I was in the old banger, where I was regularly doing 15,000 a year.
    The last time I checked I'm paying about 4p per mile. I know other Leaf owners who are 'better' drivers and who are getting closer to 5p. Driving style, types of roads and weather conditions do make a difference.
  • Quote Originally Posted by DutchCaerleon View Post
    No one can predict accurately what the future will hold, but I hazard a guess that it won’t be 2018 technology that will turn potential buyers off; it’s the remaining battery warranty period and financing options for battery replacement that may cause potential buyers to do some head scratching.
    True, we can't predict the future, but that hasn't stopped us before!

    The next 5 years will be chaos in terms of car ownership... limited no. of people will want to buy a secondhand diesel, and they’ll depreciate v quickly; cost of petrol cars (secondhand and new) will go up due to increased demand, but torq in newbought cars will be reduced due to reduced engine capacity, so spare a thought for those with horse trailers or caravans to pull.
    My prediction is in 5 years we'll look back on the 2018 EVs like the Nissan Leaf in the same way that we now look at the old Palm Pilot and Blackberry phones. With fondness at how quaintly rubbish they were, in hindsight.
    In 2023-24 or thereabouts I think the batteries will be so different, much improved, and will need only small 5-minute 'tap to charge' type charging stations.

    As an aside, but I was wondering if you could’ve converted the CR-V to LPG, cut harmful emissions and reduced your fuel bill with £1k/a or £3.5-4K over 4 years based on 10.8k mileage with a 27mpg petrol CRV... (Not the most fashionable suggestion, I admit, but I could’ve had £10k more in savings driving exactly the same car had I done it)
    It was falling apart so, no, but that's an interesting option. TBH it's a bit beyond me!
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    0
  • Quote Originally Posted by DutchCaerleon View Post
    No one can predict accurately what the future will hold, but I hazard a guess that it won’t be 2018 technology that will turn potential buyers off; it’s the remaining battery warranty period and financing options for battery replacement that may cause potential buyers to do some head scratching.
    True, we can't predict the future, but that hasn't stopped us before!

    The next 5 years will be chaos in terms of car ownership... limited no. of people will want to buy a secondhand diesel, and they’ll depreciate v quickly; cost of petrol cars (secondhand and new) will go up due to increased demand, but torq in newbought cars will be reduced due to reduced engine capacity, so spare a thought for those with horse trailers or caravans to pull.
    My prediction is in 5 years we'll look back on the 2018 EVs like the Nissan Leaf in the same way that we now look at the old Palm Pilot and Blackberry phones. With fondness at how quaintly rubbish they were, in hindsight.
    In 2023-24 or thereabouts I think the batteries will be so different, much improved, and will need only small 5-minute 'tap to charge' type charging stations.

    As an aside, but I was wondering if you could’ve converted the CR-V to LPG, cut harmful emissions and reduced your fuel bill with £1k/a or £3.5-4K over 4 years based on 10.8k mileage with a 27mpg petrol CRV... (Not the most fashionable suggestion, I admit, but I could’ve had £10k more in savings driving exactly the same car had I done it)
    It was falling apart so, no, but that's an interesting option. TBH it's a bit beyond me!
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • The Tesla model 3 is approaching my price range. Quite exciting. In fact I could go for it now but I just need to confirm on the residual value / balancing payment after 3 years. It looks like it'd look too much money on that for me to bit the bullet right now.

    However, 0% BIK for 20/21 tax year them 1% and 2%. So If I can talk work into a salary sacrifice scheme for me, I could be a Tesla owner and be finacially better off. I think.
    0
  • The Tesla model 3 is approaching my price range. Quite exciting. In fact I could go for it now but I just need to confirm on the residual value / balancing payment after 3 years. It looks like it'd look too much money on that for me to bit the bullet right now.

    However, 0% BIK for 20/21 tax year them 1% and 2%. So If I can talk work into a salary sacrifice scheme for me, I could be a Tesla owner and be finacially better off. I think.
  • Quote Originally Posted by Jowl View Post
    The Tesla model 3 is approaching my price range. Quite exciting. In fact I could go for it now but I just need to confirm on the residual value / balancing payment after 3 years. It looks like it'd look too much money on that for me to bit the bullet right now.

    However, 0% BIK for 20/21 tax year them 1% and 2%. So If I can talk work into a salary sacrifice scheme for me, I could be a Tesla owner and be finacially better off. I think.
    Wow @Jowl that would be so cool
    If you pressed a 'buy' button today would you have to wait long for it to arrive?
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    0
  • Quote Originally Posted by Jowl View Post
    The Tesla model 3 is approaching my price range. Quite exciting. In fact I could go for it now but I just need to confirm on the residual value / balancing payment after 3 years. It looks like it'd look too much money on that for me to bit the bullet right now.

    However, 0% BIK for 20/21 tax year them 1% and 2%. So If I can talk work into a salary sacrifice scheme for me, I could be a Tesla owner and be finacially better off. I think.
    Wow @Jowl that would be so cool
    If you pressed a 'buy' button today would you have to wait long for it to arrive?
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • According to the website, delivery in August. It didn't say which August though!
    0
  • According to the website, delivery in August. It didn't say which August though!
  • Quote Originally Posted by Jowl View Post
    According to the website, delivery in August. It didn't say which August though!
    Do it @Jowl
    Buy (or, rather, lease) now, repent later
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    1
  • Quote Originally Posted by Jowl View Post
    According to the website, delivery in August. It didn't say which August though!
    Do it @Jowl
    Buy (or, rather, lease) now, repent later
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • Stop encoruaging me Marc tbh I think I'd lose too much over 3 years for it to viable. We're close though....
    0
  • Stop encoruaging me Marc tbh I think I'd lose too much over 3 years for it to viable. We're close though....
  • Quote Originally Posted by Jowl View Post
    Stop encoruaging me Marc tbh I think I'd lose too much over 3 years for it to viable. We're close though....
    But think of the children @Jowl
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    1
  • Quote Originally Posted by Jowl View Post
    Stop encoruaging me Marc tbh I think I'd lose too much over 3 years for it to viable. We're close though....
    But think of the children @Jowl
    Community Manager - Pure Planet