Poll: How can Pure Planet encourage adoption of electric vehicles and support our Members who own EVs?


  • Hmmmm a very emotive topic this is. Should an EV tariff be introduced for me the answer is a simple NO. Why well PP was founded with the principle of ONE simple tariff, this was a big attraction along with the green factor,
    Can PP do more to encourage people to be greener YES i believe they can on several fronts some ideas include.

    1. PP customers get discount on solar and wind generation install projects via companies like BPlightsource.
    2. Better rates on EV public charging points and home install discounts with chargemaster etc etc.
    3. Links to green and ethical shops that give say 5% cash back which can be put as a credit onto ones own pp acct.
    4
  • Hmmmm a very emotive topic this is. Should an EV tariff be introduced for me the answer is a simple NO. Why well PP was founded with the principle of ONE simple tariff, this was a big attraction along with the green factor,
    Can PP do more to encourage people to be greener YES i believe they can on several fronts some ideas include.

    1. PP customers get discount on solar and wind generation install projects via companies like BPlightsource.
    2. Better rates on EV public charging points and home install discounts with chargemaster etc etc.
    3. Links to green and ethical shops that give say 5% cash back which can be put as a credit onto ones own pp acct.
  • Personally for me it's all about simplicity.

    PP's tariff structure works because it is simple and no matter the time of day, you always know what you are paying.
    Same goes for EV's. Complicated economy 7 tariffs wouldn't work for me because I can't guarantee that I will need to charge the car at the same time every night. Life is to fluid for that. I often need to plug in in the day if I've come back from a friends and need to be somewhere later that evening. Flat rate works better.

    When I had my Home Charger installed back in 2014, the government put a sub meter on my electric car charge feed that showed exactly what my car was drawing from the the grid. I've since moved house and not taken that with me but if memory serves me right, £220 (about 8000 miles) is what a years worth plugging in at home cost me separate to all other domesticated items. It was useful because I could prove how efficient the car was to other people so would highly recommend installing sub meters to peoples EV feed. Once you have this data, you could potentially offer annual discounts or cashback/credits based on the amount people use the car. Bit like a supermarket loyalty scheme or how BMW charge now offer points to have an i8 for a week. So for instance, for every 1000kwh hours used in a year, you get 1% free. i.e. 10kwh credited to your PP account. Just an idea.

    I do agree though that the public charging infrastructure is a shambles and needs to be simplified so this is an area PP can work on. I like Polar's monthly subscription cost of a flat fee and gives you access to theirs and other networks as well as then offering a discounted unit rate of 9p/kw for rapid chargers. Simple and easy. Instavolts PAYG contactless payment is also the best I've seen, but at 35p/kw I definitely think some sort of discount or cashback award can be used as a further incentive for PP customers as others have mentioned.
    2
  • Personally for me it's all about simplicity.

    PP's tariff structure works because it is simple and no matter the time of day, you always know what you are paying.
    Same goes for EV's. Complicated economy 7 tariffs wouldn't work for me because I can't guarantee that I will need to charge the car at the same time every night. Life is to fluid for that. I often need to plug in in the day if I've come back from a friends and need to be somewhere later that evening. Flat rate works better.

    When I had my Home Charger installed back in 2014, the government put a sub meter on my electric car charge feed that showed exactly what my car was drawing from the the grid. I've since moved house and not taken that with me but if memory serves me right, £220 (about 8000 miles) is what a years worth plugging in at home cost me separate to all other domesticated items. It was useful because I could prove how efficient the car was to other people so would highly recommend installing sub meters to peoples EV feed. Once you have this data, you could potentially offer annual discounts or cashback/credits based on the amount people use the car. Bit like a supermarket loyalty scheme or how BMW charge now offer points to have an i8 for a week. So for instance, for every 1000kwh hours used in a year, you get 1% free. i.e. 10kwh credited to your PP account. Just an idea.

    I do agree though that the public charging infrastructure is a shambles and needs to be simplified so this is an area PP can work on. I like Polar's monthly subscription cost of a flat fee and gives you access to theirs and other networks as well as then offering a discounted unit rate of 9p/kw for rapid chargers. Simple and easy. Instavolts PAYG contactless payment is also the best I've seen, but at 35p/kw I definitely think some sort of discount or cashback award can be used as a further incentive for PP customers as others have mentioned.
  • Quote Originally Posted by Stealth View Post
    Personally for me it's all about simplicity.

    PP's tariff structure works because it is simple and no matter the time of day, you always know what you are paying.
    Same goes for EV's. Complicated economy 7 tariffs wouldn't work for me because I can't guarantee that I will need to charge the car at the same time every night. Life is to fluid for that. I often need to plug in in the day if I've come back from a friends and need to be somewhere later that evening. Flat rate works better.
    Interesting and useful feedback @Stealth
    Also, on the tech side of EVs, if what the experts are saying is true, battery improvements will mean fewer charges - short bursts rather than one long overnight charge. The same way it's happened with mobile phones.
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

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  • Quote Originally Posted by Stealth View Post
    Personally for me it's all about simplicity.

    PP's tariff structure works because it is simple and no matter the time of day, you always know what you are paying.
    Same goes for EV's. Complicated economy 7 tariffs wouldn't work for me because I can't guarantee that I will need to charge the car at the same time every night. Life is to fluid for that. I often need to plug in in the day if I've come back from a friends and need to be somewhere later that evening. Flat rate works better.
    Interesting and useful feedback @Stealth
    Also, on the tech side of EVs, if what the experts are saying is true, battery improvements will mean fewer charges - short bursts rather than one long overnight charge. The same way it's happened with mobile phones.
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • Link up with all charge point electricity suppliers and create ONE app that supports all so we only need one app to access the network.
    Probably about as likely as everlasting life but defo would be worth it!
    Maybe if you got a two or three to agree there might be enough momentum that would “persuade” the other companies to join in.

    Get local councils / government to give more of a carrot to evs.
    Evs get let off ved and what else?
    How about free parking for evs instead of wacking ice drivers all the time with congestion charges etc.

    Lobby national gov to provide lower cost charging to attract more to ev use.
    V jealous of free charging in Scotland!
    2
  • Link up with all charge point electricity suppliers and create ONE app that supports all so we only need one app to access the network.
    Probably about as likely as everlasting life but defo would be worth it!
    Maybe if you got a two or three to agree there might be enough momentum that would “persuade” the other companies to join in.

    Get local councils / government to give more of a carrot to evs.
    Evs get let off ved and what else?
    How about free parking for evs instead of wacking ice drivers all the time with congestion charges etc.

    Lobby national gov to provide lower cost charging to attract more to ev use.
    V jealous of free charging in Scotland!
  • Some great ideas @Eastbath
    Link up with all charge point electricity suppliers and create ONE app that supports all so we only need one app to access the network.
    Probably about as likely as everlasting life but defo would be worth it!
    Hmmm, now that would be a challenge. But I agree it would be brill.

    V jealous of free charging in Scotland!
    Is it free charging all over Scotland for all types of public charging?!
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    0
  • Some great ideas @Eastbath
    Link up with all charge point electricity suppliers and create ONE app that supports all so we only need one app to access the network.
    Probably about as likely as everlasting life but defo would be worth it!
    Hmmm, now that would be a challenge. But I agree it would be brill.

    V jealous of free charging in Scotland!
    Is it free charging all over Scotland for all types of public charging?!
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • I have no idea, my comments are only based stuff I’ve read on other ev forums or should that be fora?
    Anyway I’ve just had a look at zap map for Scotland and if you select a rapid charger point then have a look at the comments associated, you can see that some that were previously free are now starting to charge.
    The guy who sold me my car intimated that there were lots of free public chargers about. Sadly I’ve not come across any in my neck of the woods.
    1
  • I have no idea, my comments are only based stuff I’ve read on other ev forums or should that be fora?
    Anyway I’ve just had a look at zap map for Scotland and if you select a rapid charger point then have a look at the comments associated, you can see that some that were previously free are now starting to charge.
    The guy who sold me my car intimated that there were lots of free public chargers about. Sadly I’ve not come across any in my neck of the woods.
  • Quote Originally Posted by Eastbath View Post
    ’ve just had a look at zap map for Scotland and if you select a rapid charger point then have a look at the comments associated, you can see that some that were previously free are now starting to charge.
    The guy who sold me my car intimated that there were lots of free public chargers about. Sadly I’ve not come across any in my neck of the woods.
    Doesn't surprise me @Eastbath

    And any bets on how long it'll be until the road tax exemption goes?
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    0
  • Quote Originally Posted by Eastbath View Post
    ’ve just had a look at zap map for Scotland and if you select a rapid charger point then have a look at the comments associated, you can see that some that were previously free are now starting to charge.
    The guy who sold me my car intimated that there were lots of free public chargers about. Sadly I’ve not come across any in my neck of the woods.
    Doesn't surprise me @Eastbath

    And any bets on how long it'll be until the road tax exemption goes?
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • I read recently that the government takes £28billion in road tax annually. They/we can’t afford for that to disappear so there will have to be either a tax on all vehicles regardless of fuel type or a per mile charge. When? Few years yet
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  • I read recently that the government takes £28billion in road tax annually. They/we can’t afford for that to disappear so there will have to be either a tax on all vehicles regardless of fuel type or a per mile charge. When? Few years yet
  • Quote Originally Posted by Eastbath View Post
    I read recently that the government takes £28billion in road tax annually. They/we can’t afford for that to disappear so there will have to be either a tax on all vehicles regardless of fuel type or a per mile charge. When? Few years yet
    What about a tax on the most popular roads @Eastbath
    And at the busiest times? I believe that the new smart motorways being built will allow for this.
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    0
  • Quote Originally Posted by Eastbath View Post
    I read recently that the government takes £28billion in road tax annually. They/we can’t afford for that to disappear so there will have to be either a tax on all vehicles regardless of fuel type or a per mile charge. When? Few years yet
    What about a tax on the most popular roads @Eastbath
    And at the busiest times? I believe that the new smart motorways being built will allow for this.
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • I never understood the road tax system from the consumers point of view, an arbitrary amount of money you have to pay each year regardless.

    Why not just put the tax on the fuel?

    The more you drive, the more you pay.
    The more inefficient the car, the more you pay.
    That way you can choose whether to drive or not as each journey has a cost whereas currently some people have the attitude "Well I paid road tax already, might as well drive...."

    Of course from the Governments perspective, they want to know the kind of (roughly) guaranteed income that road tax gives them.

    If the majority of cars ever gets to electric/hybrid, they will find other ways to tax regardless, they always do (And need to).

    As Marc mentioned, smart motorways is one way.
    Taxing based on your energy provider would be another, i.e. the more polluting your energy provider, in terms of how it generates the energy, the more tax applied.

    Thinking about it, if the future is most cars being electric then that is when a flat rate of road tax per electric vehicle makes more sense.
    1
  • I never understood the road tax system from the consumers point of view, an arbitrary amount of money you have to pay each year regardless.

    Why not just put the tax on the fuel?

    The more you drive, the more you pay.
    The more inefficient the car, the more you pay.
    That way you can choose whether to drive or not as each journey has a cost whereas currently some people have the attitude "Well I paid road tax already, might as well drive...."

    Of course from the Governments perspective, they want to know the kind of (roughly) guaranteed income that road tax gives them.

    If the majority of cars ever gets to electric/hybrid, they will find other ways to tax regardless, they always do (And need to).

    As Marc mentioned, smart motorways is one way.
    Taxing based on your energy provider would be another, i.e. the more polluting your energy provider, in terms of how it generates the energy, the more tax applied.

    Thinking about it, if the future is most cars being electric then that is when a flat rate of road tax per electric vehicle makes more sense.
  • Good points @Jenam93
    Right now there's so few EVs out there the zero road tax incentive doesn't really make a dent in the Government's coffers.
    Interesting idea about a lower tax for those who choose renewables. Makes sense to me!
    Also I reckon insurance companies might have a part to play. I've not really worked it out in my head yet, but as local councils are given higher clean air targets, they might start looking at legal action against high polluting drivers = higher premiums = more demand for EVs.
    See what I'm getting at?
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

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  • Good points @Jenam93
    Right now there's so few EVs out there the zero road tax incentive doesn't really make a dent in the Government's coffers.
    Interesting idea about a lower tax for those who choose renewables. Makes sense to me!
    Also I reckon insurance companies might have a part to play. I've not really worked it out in my head yet, but as local councils are given higher clean air targets, they might start looking at legal action against high polluting drivers = higher premiums = more demand for EVs.
    See what I'm getting at?
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • Hi Marc, Octopus have launched "Octopus Go" giving a night rate of 5p for EV owners. No idea what the day rate is (their site is not very transparent!) It has to have a SMETS 2 meter installed. As an EV owner it sounds very attractive but I will be staying with PP for a while. Any plans for something similar?
    1
  • Hi Marc, Octopus have launched "Octopus Go" giving a night rate of 5p for EV owners. No idea what the day rate is (their site is not very transparent!) It has to have a SMETS 2 meter installed. As an EV owner it sounds very attractive but I will be staying with PP for a while. Any plans for something similar?
  • Quote Originally Posted by Sheps View Post
    Hi Marc, Octopus have launched "Octopus Go" giving a night rate of 5p for EV owners. No idea what the day rate is (their site is not very transparent!) It has to have a SMETS 2 meter installed. As an EV owner it sounds very attractive but I will be staying with PP for a while. Any plans for something similar?
    Hi @Sheps
    I've had a look at the Octopus Go offer.
    I'm a bit confused.
    In one section they say that a smart meter is optional and that it's only available to the first 1,000 customers.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    And in another section it states that you have a SMETS1 meter and that they've stopped installing them.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    This is exactly the sort of confusion we don't want.
    One of the things Pure Planet Members like about us is a our one, simple variable tariff.
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    0
  • Quote Originally Posted by Sheps View Post
    Hi Marc, Octopus have launched "Octopus Go" giving a night rate of 5p for EV owners. No idea what the day rate is (their site is not very transparent!) It has to have a SMETS 2 meter installed. As an EV owner it sounds very attractive but I will be staying with PP for a while. Any plans for something similar?
    Hi @Sheps
    I've had a look at the Octopus Go offer.
    I'm a bit confused.
    In one section they say that a smart meter is optional and that it's only available to the first 1,000 customers.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Go only for 1k.PNG 
Views:	206 
Size:	28.3 KB 
ID:	1931

    And in another section it states that you have a SMETS1 meter and that they've stopped installing them.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Octopus Go.PNG 
Views:	206 
Size:	24.0 KB 
ID:	1932


    This is exactly the sort of confusion we don't want.
    One of the things Pure Planet Members like about us is a our one, simple variable tariff.
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • I think and overnight off peak tariff will become inevitable. Already some EV's have the ability to feed & support the house at peak times and then re-charge at night. I've seen papers suggesting fuel cells could do this on a micro-generation level too. As the battery is a large proportion of the cost of an EV you'd think we'd make best use of it especially whilst it's parked on the drive.

    Peak demand is a huge challenge for the grid. As you'll know, at some times of the day there is a surplus and therefore as EV's take hold they can be part of the solution.

    I love the member community model and the simplicity of a flat rate however I would have to consider others who offer cheaper off-peak prices. I already have PV which both reduces my demand by around 20% and generates a surplus during the day. So this dilutes the flat tariff benefit of Pure Planet a little.

    I'm sceptical about the whole smart meter thing but I think smarter use of energy is inevitable.

    all the best



    ​Jon
    4
  • I think and overnight off peak tariff will become inevitable. Already some EV's have the ability to feed & support the house at peak times and then re-charge at night. I've seen papers suggesting fuel cells could do this on a micro-generation level too. As the battery is a large proportion of the cost of an EV you'd think we'd make best use of it especially whilst it's parked on the drive.

    Peak demand is a huge challenge for the grid. As you'll know, at some times of the day there is a surplus and therefore as EV's take hold they can be part of the solution.

    I love the member community model and the simplicity of a flat rate however I would have to consider others who offer cheaper off-peak prices. I already have PV which both reduces my demand by around 20% and generates a surplus during the day. So this dilutes the flat tariff benefit of Pure Planet a little.

    I'm sceptical about the whole smart meter thing but I think smarter use of energy is inevitable.

    all the best



    ​Jon
  • Quote Originally Posted by Jon Godfrey View Post
    I think and overnight off peak tariff will become inevitable. Already some EV's have the ability to feed & support the house at peak times and then re-charge at night. I've seen papers suggesting fuel cells could do this on a micro-generation level too. As the battery is a large proportion of the cost of an EV you'd think we'd make best use of it especially whilst it's parked on the drive.

    Peak demand is a huge challenge for the grid. As you'll know, at some times of the day there is a surplus and therefore as EV's take hold they can be part of the solution.

    I love the member community model and the simplicity of a flat rate however I would have to consider others who offer cheaper off-peak prices. I already have PV which both reduces my demand by around 20% and generates a surplus during the day. So this dilutes the flat tariff benefit of Pure Planet a little.

    I'm sceptical about the whole smart meter thing but I think smarter use of energy is inevitable.

    all the best

    ​Jon
    Great input @Jon Godfrey
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    1
  • Quote Originally Posted by Jon Godfrey View Post
    I think and overnight off peak tariff will become inevitable. Already some EV's have the ability to feed & support the house at peak times and then re-charge at night. I've seen papers suggesting fuel cells could do this on a micro-generation level too. As the battery is a large proportion of the cost of an EV you'd think we'd make best use of it especially whilst it's parked on the drive.

    Peak demand is a huge challenge for the grid. As you'll know, at some times of the day there is a surplus and therefore as EV's take hold they can be part of the solution.

    I love the member community model and the simplicity of a flat rate however I would have to consider others who offer cheaper off-peak prices. I already have PV which both reduces my demand by around 20% and generates a surplus during the day. So this dilutes the flat tariff benefit of Pure Planet a little.

    I'm sceptical about the whole smart meter thing but I think smarter use of energy is inevitable.

    all the best

    ​Jon
    Great input @Jon Godfrey
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • I had a few more thoughts on how a Vehicle to Grid (V2G) and overnight charging tariff might work for me;

    I have been thinking that I will probably jump on to the EV carrousel when the availability of circa 60Kw vehicles become more available. There are options now but with long lead times. I do a number of circa 200 mileround trips but most is short around my home.

    I have a 3.2Kw PV system which put me in surplus most days between say 11am and 3pm to make it easy. I’m consuming around 18Kw/h a day so let’s round that to 20Kw/h per day. So, in theory (ignoring losses as I’ve rounded up) I could run my house for a whole day and use 1/3rdof the stored energy in the car, which I’d never need to do I hope.

    On a 6 to 7 Kw home charging circuit between say 12.30 and 4.30am I could add in charge at the low end 24Kwh to the car. Now, I probably wouldn’t want to keep the car at 100% charge for battery life and I want to store my solar surplus which even on a sunny day might be around 10Kwh. I would only be capturing this surplus whilst my car is at home during the day unless I spend money on a battery storage system.

    But I also need to keep a reasonable range available for when the car is needed so I’d be looking to end the day with around 40/50% of the car battery capacity left. We would then deplete the car at peak power demands (again assuming the car is at home) leaving at least 20% before the charge overnight.

    The big down-side is the car needs to be plugged in to the house for peak times which generally it would be anyway. I estimate this might push somewhere around 70% of our power usage to off peak.

    Assuming a night time tariff of £0.05 that would save me nearly 50% of my current electricity cost (around £500 a year) but that excludes what we would use through the use of the car so the savings could be significant.

    On a larger scale if adopted widely it would flatten the peaks and fill the troughs of the grid.

    I think this is pretty compelling… when all the tech is available.
    2
  • I had a few more thoughts on how a Vehicle to Grid (V2G) and overnight charging tariff might work for me;

    I have been thinking that I will probably jump on to the EV carrousel when the availability of circa 60Kw vehicles become more available. There are options now but with long lead times. I do a number of circa 200 mileround trips but most is short around my home.

    I have a 3.2Kw PV system which put me in surplus most days between say 11am and 3pm to make it easy. I’m consuming around 18Kw/h a day so let’s round that to 20Kw/h per day. So, in theory (ignoring losses as I’ve rounded up) I could run my house for a whole day and use 1/3rdof the stored energy in the car, which I’d never need to do I hope.

    On a 6 to 7 Kw home charging circuit between say 12.30 and 4.30am I could add in charge at the low end 24Kwh to the car. Now, I probably wouldn’t want to keep the car at 100% charge for battery life and I want to store my solar surplus which even on a sunny day might be around 10Kwh. I would only be capturing this surplus whilst my car is at home during the day unless I spend money on a battery storage system.

    But I also need to keep a reasonable range available for when the car is needed so I’d be looking to end the day with around 40/50% of the car battery capacity left. We would then deplete the car at peak power demands (again assuming the car is at home) leaving at least 20% before the charge overnight.

    The big down-side is the car needs to be plugged in to the house for peak times which generally it would be anyway. I estimate this might push somewhere around 70% of our power usage to off peak.

    Assuming a night time tariff of £0.05 that would save me nearly 50% of my current electricity cost (around £500 a year) but that excludes what we would use through the use of the car so the savings could be significant.

    On a larger scale if adopted widely it would flatten the peaks and fill the troughs of the grid.

    I think this is pretty compelling… when all the tech is available.
  • I forgot from my calculations the standard day tariffs go UP with many of these "charge over night" deals. Sad I woke up this morning thinking my calculations are wrong!!

    So, the saving is over stated. If the car wasn't available at peak times there would be a punitive energy rate. I'm not sure I'd want to be thinking "is the car attached?" at peak times.
    1
  • I forgot from my calculations the standard day tariffs go UP with many of these "charge over night" deals. Sad I woke up this morning thinking my calculations are wrong!!

    So, the saving is over stated. If the car wasn't available at peak times there would be a punitive energy rate. I'm not sure I'd want to be thinking "is the car attached?" at peak times.
  • Hey @Jon Godfrey
    Complicated, isn't it?!
    Even early adopters who are happy to "do the math" aren't convinced. By the time this becomes mass market it needs to much simpler, as well as transparent.
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    1
  • Hey @Jon Godfrey
    Complicated, isn't it?!
    Even early adopters who are happy to "do the math" aren't convinced. By the time this becomes mass market it needs to much simpler, as well as transparent.
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • I’ve been running an EV now (an I-Pace) for 7 months and covered around 9,000 miles. Like many here the majority of charging is at home.
    There are frustrations with the charging networks but that is primarily because we have chargers scattered round in ones and occasionally twos, rather than grouped in hubs. There are exceptions, the J14 hub on M1 at Milton Keynes, the new Ionity network slowly creeping into the UK and of course Tesla’s Superchargers. So my priority would be to get hubs. Any new chargers have to offer an open ad hoc charging system I believe. So contactless bank card as Instavolt offer is likely to become more widespread.
    so for Pure Planet, I’d suggest working on properly smart home charging systems. Perhaps the car to home charging would help reduce peak demand, or something connected to carbon intensity? Given the flat charge rate, I tend to keep an eye on the grid carbon intensity via an app and charge at low intensity times. I know all PP electricity is renewable anyway but it makes me feel better :-)
    There is the Zappi system that is meant to balance home PV generation with car charging but it seems a bit flaky still reading the forums, possibly around communication issues between the unit and the charger. Next generation one from PP?
    I’d be happy to let PP access a few kWh from my car if it was plugged in and fully charged and there was a sudden demand for power.
    0
  • I’ve been running an EV now (an I-Pace) for 7 months and covered around 9,000 miles. Like many here the majority of charging is at home.
    There are frustrations with the charging networks but that is primarily because we have chargers scattered round in ones and occasionally twos, rather than grouped in hubs. There are exceptions, the J14 hub on M1 at Milton Keynes, the new Ionity network slowly creeping into the UK and of course Tesla’s Superchargers. So my priority would be to get hubs. Any new chargers have to offer an open ad hoc charging system I believe. So contactless bank card as Instavolt offer is likely to become more widespread.
    so for Pure Planet, I’d suggest working on properly smart home charging systems. Perhaps the car to home charging would help reduce peak demand, or something connected to carbon intensity? Given the flat charge rate, I tend to keep an eye on the grid carbon intensity via an app and charge at low intensity times. I know all PP electricity is renewable anyway but it makes me feel better :-)
    There is the Zappi system that is meant to balance home PV generation with car charging but it seems a bit flaky still reading the forums, possibly around communication issues between the unit and the charger. Next generation one from PP?
    I’d be happy to let PP access a few kWh from my car if it was plugged in and fully charged and there was a sudden demand for power.
  • But are you factoring in the huge reduction in fuel cost? I have an EV and am now spending a bit more on the leccy but nothing on petrol resulting in saving money. I too have 4KWp PV's but they could never be enough for me to charge the car.
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  • But are you factoring in the huge reduction in fuel cost? I have an EV and am now spending a bit more on the leccy but nothing on petrol resulting in saving money. I too have 4KWp PV's but they could never be enough for me to charge the car.