• Heat Pumps

    Anybody using heat-pumps to warm their homes?

    I know a couple of homes that have them. One is a substantial farmhouse using a ground-source heat-pump system. Terribly sophisticated with underfloor thermostatic temperature control in every room, including the garage. Horrendous capital outlay to install it, mitigated only by the fact the farmhouse was a new build. Allegedly cheap as chips to run, but I do wonder what the long-term reliability will be like.

    The other is an old timber home in northern Idaho, where they have serious winters. That home has an air-source heat-pump system with warm air ducted to every room, supplemented by a log burner which is called into service when the snow is feet thick and the temperate way below zero Fahrenheit.

    I'd be interested in hearing other people's experiences of heat-pump systems.
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  • Anybody using heat-pumps to warm their homes?

    I know a couple of homes that have them. One is a substantial farmhouse using a ground-source heat-pump system. Terribly sophisticated with underfloor thermostatic temperature control in every room, including the garage. Horrendous capital outlay to install it, mitigated only by the fact the farmhouse was a new build. Allegedly cheap as chips to run, but I do wonder what the long-term reliability will be like.

    The other is an old timber home in northern Idaho, where they have serious winters. That home has an air-source heat-pump system with warm air ducted to every room, supplemented by a log burner which is called into service when the snow is feet thick and the temperate way below zero Fahrenheit.

    I'd be interested in hearing other people's experiences of heat-pump systems.
  • Hmmm. Nobody, by the looks of things. Yet we've all got one or more of them in our homes. Virtual beer to the first person to say what and where they're fitted.
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  • Hmmm. Nobody, by the looks of things. Yet we've all got one or more of them in our homes. Virtual beer to the first person to say what and where they're fitted.
  • Quote Originally Posted by Oakbank View Post
    Hmmm. Nobody, by the looks of things. Yet we've all got one or more of them in our homes. Virtual beer to the first person to say what and where they're fitted.
    Do you mean the pump housed inside the boiler cabinet?
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  • Quote Originally Posted by Oakbank View Post
    Hmmm. Nobody, by the looks of things. Yet we've all got one or more of them in our homes. Virtual beer to the first person to say what and where they're fitted.
    Do you mean the pump housed inside the boiler cabinet?
  • Quote Originally Posted by David j View Post
    Do you mean the pump housed inside the boiler cabinet?
    Nope. Nice try though.
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  • Quote Originally Posted by David j View Post
    Do you mean the pump housed inside the boiler cabinet?
    Nope. Nice try though.
  • Oh dear, no virtual beer for me tonight ☹️
    I await the answer Oakbank
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  • Oh dear, no virtual beer for me tonight ☹️
    I await the answer Oakbank
  • OK, last shot for me, I think this is a trick question - is the answer a ‘hairdryer ‘ 😂😂
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  • OK, last shot for me, I think this is a trick question - is the answer a ‘hairdryer ‘ 😂😂
  • Fridge m’dears
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  • Fridge m’dears
  • Yes a fridge is about the closest you can get...the ground beneath your feet is a few degrees warmer than your house, so as a fridge draws the heat from it's insides by evaporating coolant (imagine pouring vodka on your hand and blowing on it, thus making it evaporate your hand would feel cold and then catching the fumes, and compressing it to be re-evaporated, compressing it warms it up (The coolant coils on the back of the fridge get warm) and this provides heat (if you've ever pumped up a bicycle tyre and felt the end of the pump as the air is compressed it would be warm) that's the principle of a heat pump.
    The coolant is evaporated at low pressure and absorbs the heat from the ground then is compressed and the heat is exchanged.
    The trick lies in using slightly less energy to compress the coolant than the heat you extract. That's what gives you "free" energy.
    Physics never was my strong point...
    I have a near neighbour who has one fitted but they wouldn't have a clue how or why it works, they just had a lot of money and had one fitted...
    Quote Originally Posted by Eastbath View Post
    Fridge m’dears
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  • Yes a fridge is about the closest you can get...the ground beneath your feet is a few degrees warmer than your house, so as a fridge draws the heat from it's insides by evaporating coolant (imagine pouring vodka on your hand and blowing on it, thus making it evaporate your hand would feel cold and then catching the fumes, and compressing it to be re-evaporated, compressing it warms it up (The coolant coils on the back of the fridge get warm) and this provides heat (if you've ever pumped up a bicycle tyre and felt the end of the pump as the air is compressed it would be warm) that's the principle of a heat pump.
    The coolant is evaporated at low pressure and absorbs the heat from the ground then is compressed and the heat is exchanged.
    The trick lies in using slightly less energy to compress the coolant than the heat you extract. That's what gives you "free" energy.
    Physics never was my strong point...
    I have a near neighbour who has one fitted but they wouldn't have a clue how or why it works, they just had a lot of money and had one fitted...
    Quote Originally Posted by Eastbath View Post
    Fridge m’dears
  • We have some Austrian friends who put in a ground source heat pump system when they built a house
    It worked really well, I can remember our son skooting around the floor in a nappy and t shirt when there was 4ft of snow outside.
    On the other han we have friends near us who had an air source heat pump in their new build and it’s not been good but I think that’s down to incompetent installers.
    BTW the source doesn’t need to be warmer that the house, just above absolute zero (sic)
    The heat pump takes the source energy and lifts to a more useable level. I’ve heard figures of 4to 1 for the power consumption ie you put in 1kw of electricity and get 4kw of heat out.
    Last edited by Eastbath; 26-02-19 at 10:02. Reason: Not finished
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  • We have some Austrian friends who put in a ground source heat pump system when they built a house
    It worked really well, I can remember our son skooting around the floor in a nappy and t shirt when there was 4ft of snow outside.
    On the other han we have friends near us who had an air source heat pump in their new build and it’s not been good but I think that’s down to incompetent installers.
    BTW the source doesn’t need to be warmer that the house, just above absolute zero (sic)
    The heat pump takes the source energy and lifts to a more useable level. I’ve heard figures of 4to 1 for the power consumption ie you put in 1kw of electricity and get 4kw of heat out.
  • Great answers, I knew all along 😜
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  • Great answers, I knew all along 😜
  • Yep, Eastbath has the first correct answer.

    Your fridge and freezer are both heat pumps.
    They both contain a compressor, which compresses refrigerant vapour and sends it to an external heat exchanger where the vapour condenses into a liquid.
    From the condenser the liquid is piped to an internal heat exchanger where the liquid takes heat from its surroundings and turns back into a vapour, which is piped to a compressor, which compresses . . . . . . . and so on ad infinitum

    There's a little bit more to it, but that's the gist of it.
    1
  • Yep, Eastbath has the first correct answer.

    Your fridge and freezer are both heat pumps.
    They both contain a compressor, which compresses refrigerant vapour and sends it to an external heat exchanger where the vapour condenses into a liquid.
    From the condenser the liquid is piped to an internal heat exchanger where the liquid takes heat from its surroundings and turns back into a vapour, which is piped to a compressor, which compresses . . . . . . . and so on ad infinitum

    There's a little bit more to it, but that's the gist of it.
  • you’re quite right, above abs 0, sorry I shouldn't have made that error, stupid of me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eastbath View Post
    We have some Austrian friends who put in a ground source heat pump system when they built a house
    It worked really well, I can remember our son skooting around the floor in a nappy and t shirt when there was 4ft of snow outside.
    On the other han we have friends near us who had an air source heat pump in their new build and it’s not been good but I think that’s down to incompetent installers.
    BTW the source doesn’t need to be warmer that the house, just above absolute zero (sic)
    The heat pump takes the source energy and lifts to a more useable level. I’ve heard figures of 4to 1 for the power consumption ie you put in 1kw of electricity and get 4kw of heat out.
    Last edited by woz; 27-02-19 at 03:47.
    0
  • you’re quite right, above abs 0, sorry I shouldn't have made that error, stupid of me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eastbath View Post
    We have some Austrian friends who put in a ground source heat pump system when they built a house
    It worked really well, I can remember our son skooting around the floor in a nappy and t shirt when there was 4ft of snow outside.
    On the other han we have friends near us who had an air source heat pump in their new build and it’s not been good but I think that’s down to incompetent installers.
    BTW the source doesn’t need to be warmer that the house, just above absolute zero (sic)
    The heat pump takes the source energy and lifts to a more useable level. I’ve heard figures of 4to 1 for the power consumption ie you put in 1kw of electricity and get 4kw of heat out.
  • Castle Howard near York is run off ground source heatpump saves them thousands compared to oil they used before.
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  • Castle Howard near York is run off ground source heatpump saves them thousands compared to oil they used before.