• Just for fun..here's one for nerds..Meters going over 99999...

    Just for fun...for those with a nerdy disposition it would be interesting to work out whether it would be cheaper to treat each electric meter going over 99999 event manually, or to have to upgrade the software to deal with it (it probably already does but that would be no fun).
    In other words how many DOMESTIC meters go over 99999 every year?


    There are about 24 million electric meters in England (source local gov.), I don't have figures for the rest of the UK but if it's pro-rata population there will be about 30 million meters in the UK.
    If average typical consumption is about 3800 kWh/year (.gov source) it would take 26 years on average for a meter to reach 99999, of course averages won't tell you the full story.
    Those who use much larger that average amounts of energy will reach 99999 much faster.
    But in the absence of any figures for that (unless someone knows) how many meters are replaced before they get to 26 years old? Probably most?

    What with smart meter rollout and certification periods for meters (of which only a tiny proportion exceed 20 years) I'm going to assume only a very small percentage don't get changed *my guess is less than 1% - does anyone know the real figure? @MrSmart ?

    If so that means out of 30 million 300,000 may reach 99999 in 26 years, which is 11,500 a year on average. (I don't believe that figure, intuitively it seems high...)
    (The big 6 have 75% of the market that leaves 25% of events for the medium/smaller suppliers)
    assuming pp have .5% of the market that means PP will have 58 instances a year of meters going over 99999. If each one takes 15 mins that's 2 working (wo)man-days a year to deal with it.
    *Of course some of my assumptions are flaky, is anyone nerdy enough to respond and shoot my post down?
    (responses of who cares or get a life don't count)
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    Last edited by woz; 28-12-18 at 18:25.
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  • Just for fun...for those with a nerdy disposition it would be interesting to work out whether it would be cheaper to treat each electric meter going over 99999 event manually, or to have to upgrade the software to deal with it (it probably already does but that would be no fun).
    In other words how many DOMESTIC meters go over 99999 every year?


    There are about 24 million electric meters in England (source local gov.), I don't have figures for the rest of the UK but if it's pro-rata population there will be about 30 million meters in the UK.
    If average typical consumption is about 3800 kWh/year (.gov source) it would take 26 years on average for a meter to reach 99999, of course averages won't tell you the full story.
    Those who use much larger that average amounts of energy will reach 99999 much faster.
    But in the absence of any figures for that (unless someone knows) how many meters are replaced before they get to 26 years old? Probably most?

    What with smart meter rollout and certification periods for meters (of which only a tiny proportion exceed 20 years) I'm going to assume only a very small percentage don't get changed *my guess is less than 1% - does anyone know the real figure? @MrSmart ?

    If so that means out of 30 million 300,000 may reach 99999 in 26 years, which is 11,500 a year on average. (I don't believe that figure, intuitively it seems high...)
    (The big 6 have 75% of the market that leaves 25% of events for the medium/smaller suppliers)
    assuming pp have .5% of the market that means PP will have 58 instances a year of meters going over 99999. If each one takes 15 mins that's 2 working (wo)man-days a year to deal with it.
    *Of course some of my assumptions are flaky, is anyone nerdy enough to respond and shoot my post down?
    (responses of who cares or get a life don't count)
    HAPPY NEW YEAR


  • If the billing software is well written, the meter roll-over should already be taken care. Hence no future software upgrade is required.
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  • If the billing software is well written, the meter roll-over should already be taken care. Hence no future software upgrade is required.


  • Hi WOZ,
    It is obvious that you intend to leave 2018 with a BANG! I had to have a large espresso half way through this post, however, I still LEARNED something new (I must be an apprentice NERD).

    BRILL 👍😄👍😄
    0
  • Hi WOZ,
    It is obvious that you intend to leave 2018 with a BANG! I had to have a large espresso half way through this post, however, I still LEARNED something new (I must be an apprentice NERD).

    BRILL 👍😄👍😄


  • very true, but if we assume that then where's the fun in thinking about it...it's not really about the destination but about the journey...

    Quote Originally Posted by A Sutton User View Post
    If the billing software is well written, the meter roll-over should already be taken care. Hence no future software upgrade is required.
    Last edited by woz; 28-12-18 at 22:01.
    0
  • very true, but if we assume that then where's the fun in thinking about it...it's not really about the destination but about the journey...

    Quote Originally Posted by A Sutton User View Post
    If the billing software is well written, the meter roll-over should already be taken care. Hence no future software upgrade is required.


  • Once you become an apprentice the time to becoming a fully qualified nerd is very short...
    The ofgem report alone was worth the post for those who are interested in the energy market.
    Quote Originally Posted by David j View Post
    Hi WOZ,
    It is obvious that you intend to leave 2018 with a BANG! I had to have a large espresso half way through this post, however, I still LEARNED something new (I must be an apprentice NERD).

    BRILL ���������������� �������
    2
  • Once you become an apprentice the time to becoming a fully qualified nerd is very short...
    The ofgem report alone was worth the post for those who are interested in the energy market.
    Quote Originally Posted by David j View Post
    Hi WOZ,
    It is obvious that you intend to leave 2018 with a BANG! I had to have a large espresso half way through this post, however, I still LEARNED something new (I must be an apprentice NERD).

    BRILL ���������������� �������