• Reducing Energy Bills

    We all want to reduce our energy bills. That's why we've joined Pure Planet, isn't it?

    But what about reducing our energy consumption?

    Let's have some tips of what's worked for you and what didn't.

    I'll start with outside security lights. If you have them already installed there is a good chance they are high wattage tungsten filament lamps, anything up to 500W. Replace them with CREE LED security lights as they consume a fraction of the power and last longer. A win-win situation.

    Have you ever cleaned the fluff that accumulates on the heat exchanger behind your fridge or freezer? No? Me neither as I would probably do myself a serious injury moving them. The question is, how much is that extra fluff insulating the heat exchanger costing me?
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  • We all want to reduce our energy bills. That's why we've joined Pure Planet, isn't it?

    But what about reducing our energy consumption?

    Let's have some tips of what's worked for you and what didn't.

    I'll start with outside security lights. If you have them already installed there is a good chance they are high wattage tungsten filament lamps, anything up to 500W. Replace them with CREE LED security lights as they consume a fraction of the power and last longer. A win-win situation.

    Have you ever cleaned the fluff that accumulates on the heat exchanger behind your fridge or freezer? No? Me neither as I would probably do myself a serious injury moving them. The question is, how much is that extra fluff insulating the heat exchanger costing me?
  • OMG only last weekyendybendy I did just that with my fridge! 🙀🙀🙀🙀🙀🙀🙀👍. On life! Clean as a whistle 👍👍👍
    Peace is always beautiful.

    WALT WHITMAN

    Avatar - Saturn pics slightly boring so socks it is!
    1
  • OMG only last weekyendybendy I did just that with my fridge! 🙀🙀🙀🙀🙀🙀🙀👍. On life! Clean as a whistle 👍👍👍
    Peace is always beautiful.

    WALT WHITMAN

    Avatar - Saturn pics slightly boring so socks it is!
  • I never knew there was fluff behind the fridge freezer. I have heard you can get fluff in the belly button? Lol.
    Peace and Luve

    Yours in Stitches

    Ory 🌏🌞
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  • I never knew there was fluff behind the fridge freezer. I have heard you can get fluff in the belly button? Lol.
    Peace and Luve

    Yours in Stitches

    Ory 🌏🌞
  • Nice thread @Oakbank

    I'll start with outside security lights. If you have them already installed there is a good chance they are high wattage tungsten filament lamps, anything up to 500W. Replace them with CREE LED security lights as they consume a fraction of the power and last longer. A win-win situation.
    Good call, we're doing this exact same thing.
    We're also looking at wall insulation. As well as laying insulation in the loft, it's said that you can save up to £245 a year from insualtion wall cavities.
    There's an upfront cost, of course, but that'll be reimbursed after a few years.
    Some good info about it here.
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

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  • Nice thread @Oakbank

    I'll start with outside security lights. If you have them already installed there is a good chance they are high wattage tungsten filament lamps, anything up to 500W. Replace them with CREE LED security lights as they consume a fraction of the power and last longer. A win-win situation.
    Good call, we're doing this exact same thing.
    We're also looking at wall insulation. As well as laying insulation in the loft, it's said that you can save up to £245 a year from insualtion wall cavities.
    There's an upfront cost, of course, but that'll be reimbursed after a few years.
    Some good info about it here.
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • Moving in to a new home or changing your carpets?

    Then it’s a good time to look at that gap between the skirting board and the floorboards. You might think, “Oh, it’s only a millimetre or so. Hardly worth bothering about”.

    Fact is, that hairline gap all the way around your room could add up to the equivalent of a hole you could get your fist through (well, it could in my house).

    Your local hardware store will sell you a cartridge of frame sealant (not silicon bath sealant!) and a cartridge gun. Get down on your hands and knees and fill that gap before the carpet gripper and underlay goes down. You’d be surprised at the difference it makes.
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  • Moving in to a new home or changing your carpets?

    Then it’s a good time to look at that gap between the skirting board and the floorboards. You might think, “Oh, it’s only a millimetre or so. Hardly worth bothering about”.

    Fact is, that hairline gap all the way around your room could add up to the equivalent of a hole you could get your fist through (well, it could in my house).

    Your local hardware store will sell you a cartridge of frame sealant (not silicon bath sealant!) and a cartridge gun. Get down on your hands and knees and fill that gap before the carpet gripper and underlay goes down. You’d be surprised at the difference it makes.
  • Quote Originally Posted by Oakbank View Post
    Moving in to a new home or changing your carpets?

    Then it’s a good time to look at that gap between the skirting board and the floorboards. You might think, “Oh, it’s only a millimetre or so. Hardly worth bothering about”.

    Fact is, that hairline gap all the way around your room could add up to the equivalent of a hole you could get your fist through (well, it could in my house).

    Your local hardware store will sell you a cartridge of frame sealant (not silicon bath sealant!) and a cartridge gun. Get down on your hands and knees and fill that gap before the carpet gripper and underlay goes down. You’d be surprised at the difference it makes.

    Great tip @Oakbank
    I suppose we ought to mention windows?
    Double (or triple) glazing will save a lot - about £75 a year for a semi-detached house accrording to the Energy Saving Trust.
    Plus there'll be less noise
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

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  • Quote Originally Posted by Oakbank View Post
    Moving in to a new home or changing your carpets?

    Then it’s a good time to look at that gap between the skirting board and the floorboards. You might think, “Oh, it’s only a millimetre or so. Hardly worth bothering about”.

    Fact is, that hairline gap all the way around your room could add up to the equivalent of a hole you could get your fist through (well, it could in my house).

    Your local hardware store will sell you a cartridge of frame sealant (not silicon bath sealant!) and a cartridge gun. Get down on your hands and knees and fill that gap before the carpet gripper and underlay goes down. You’d be surprised at the difference it makes.

    Great tip @Oakbank
    I suppose we ought to mention windows?
    Double (or triple) glazing will save a lot - about £75 a year for a semi-detached house accrording to the Energy Saving Trust.
    Plus there'll be less noise
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • Anyone have any advice how I might get external wall insulation as I live in a solid wall semi with no cavity
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  • Anyone have any advice how I might get external wall insulation as I live in a solid wall semi with no cavity
  • There are a lot of companies advertising external wall insulation. Personally, I think it's early days yet; a bit like when double glazing in the UK first kicked off and there was a proliferation of cowboy companies.

    Saying that, one of my daughters, who lives in a council house, has had her house externally clad; the difference is amazing. Her already modest heating bills were slashed.
    1
  • There are a lot of companies advertising external wall insulation. Personally, I think it's early days yet; a bit like when double glazing in the UK first kicked off and there was a proliferation of cowboy companies.

    Saying that, one of my daughters, who lives in a council house, has had her house externally clad; the difference is amazing. Her already modest heating bills were slashed.
  • Depending on how much of your room you're prepared to lose and whether redecoration is imminent, internal insulation is sometimes worth considering too.
    Quote Originally Posted by Daspy View Post
    Anyone have any advice how I might get external wall insulation as I live in a solid wall semi with no cavity
    2
  • Depending on how much of your room you're prepared to lose and whether redecoration is imminent, internal insulation is sometimes worth considering too.
    Quote Originally Posted by Daspy View Post
    Anyone have any advice how I might get external wall insulation as I live in a solid wall semi with no cavity
  • Cheers Oakbank. Appreciate the response.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Cheers Woz have looked at both internal and external. At the moment feel that external would create less faffing eg redecorating, electric points, doorways etc.
    1
  • Cheers Oakbank. Appreciate the response.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Cheers Woz have looked at both internal and external. At the moment feel that external would create less faffing eg redecorating, electric points, doorways etc.
  • Any Technology which is connected to a network (be it the internet or a local network) tends to use a lot more energy on standby.

    My energy saving tip is to get the standing consumption of your home as low as possible. Anything that's on 24/365¼ adds up, and now with smart TVs and smart everything else, standing consumption is increasing.
    We're going backwards!

    Happy New Year to all!
    1
  • Any Technology which is connected to a network (be it the internet or a local network) tends to use a lot more energy on standby.

    My energy saving tip is to get the standing consumption of your home as low as possible. Anything that's on 24/365¼ adds up, and now with smart TVs and smart everything else, standing consumption is increasing.
    We're going backwards!

    Happy New Year to all!
  • Exterior cladding is a great way to insulate a house. Basically cover house in a weather proof insulation board then cover with your cladding of choice. Ours is wood.
    Can be done by a sensible DIY jobby type person just batton the brickwork pack in insulation then clad fixes to batten frame.
    Warning strict fire and building regs apply and you will proberly need planning permission.
    1
  • Exterior cladding is a great way to insulate a house. Basically cover house in a weather proof insulation board then cover with your cladding of choice. Ours is wood.
    Can be done by a sensible DIY jobby type person just batton the brickwork pack in insulation then clad fixes to batten frame.
    Warning strict fire and building regs apply and you will proberly need planning permission.
  • When we renovated our 1930s semi we used therma board on the old non cavity walls (double brick with no cavity. It did help insulate the room.
    2
  • When we renovated our 1930s semi we used therma board on the old non cavity walls (double brick with no cavity. It did help insulate the room.
  • Quote Originally Posted by Suz View Post
    When we renovated our 1930s semi we used therma board on the old non cavity walls (double brick with no cavity. It did help insulate the room.
    Does that not cause a little bit too much moisture?
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

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  • Quote Originally Posted by Suz View Post
    When we renovated our 1930s semi we used therma board on the old non cavity walls (double brick with no cavity. It did help insulate the room.
    Does that not cause a little bit too much moisture?
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • I've posted elsewhere about the Weather Compensation kit I fitted to my Ideal Logic Heat boiler. Today (14th Jan) I submitted meter reading prior to tomorrows tariff increase. The PP app immediately came back with a "Reading lower than expected" message under the gas reading.
    I entered the new values into my energy tracking spreadsheet to see by how much my gas consumption has been reduced. The result is quite dramatic.

    Average consumption for December. 519 cuft/day = £4.47/day
    Average consumption 5th ~ 14 Jan. 449 cuft/day = £3.87/day

    Now a 60p/day saving might not sound all that much, but it's a lot of money over an entire year. For me it's like a free month of gas and electricity! (sorry PP )

    Now here's the biggie. When spending money to improve your home's energy efficiency you have to consider the payback period.

    For me, double glazing is not financially viable. Even if the local planning eejits gave me permission, the payback period would be measured in decades. I've already plugged all the gaps that let heat escape and cold air enter. The loft has a couple of feet of insulation and we even fitted underfloor insulation on the ground floor when we renovated the property and we have energy efficient lighting throughout.
    The net result has been a year-on-year reduction in energy consumption. Yeah!

    What's the payback period for Weather Compensation? Less than two months!

    My kit cost £21 and took only a couple of hours to fit (plus a couple of days 'tuning'). Even if you pay a central heating engineer to install weather compensation it should pay for itself in only a few months.

    If your boiler is suitable I can't recommend it enough.
    1
  • I've posted elsewhere about the Weather Compensation kit I fitted to my Ideal Logic Heat boiler. Today (14th Jan) I submitted meter reading prior to tomorrows tariff increase. The PP app immediately came back with a "Reading lower than expected" message under the gas reading.
    I entered the new values into my energy tracking spreadsheet to see by how much my gas consumption has been reduced. The result is quite dramatic.

    Average consumption for December. 519 cuft/day = £4.47/day
    Average consumption 5th ~ 14 Jan. 449 cuft/day = £3.87/day

    Now a 60p/day saving might not sound all that much, but it's a lot of money over an entire year. For me it's like a free month of gas and electricity! (sorry PP )

    Now here's the biggie. When spending money to improve your home's energy efficiency you have to consider the payback period.

    For me, double glazing is not financially viable. Even if the local planning eejits gave me permission, the payback period would be measured in decades. I've already plugged all the gaps that let heat escape and cold air enter. The loft has a couple of feet of insulation and we even fitted underfloor insulation on the ground floor when we renovated the property and we have energy efficient lighting throughout.
    The net result has been a year-on-year reduction in energy consumption. Yeah!

    What's the payback period for Weather Compensation? Less than two months!

    My kit cost £21 and took only a couple of hours to fit (plus a couple of days 'tuning'). Even if you pay a central heating engineer to install weather compensation it should pay for itself in only a few months.

    If your boiler is suitable I can't recommend it enough.
  • Quote Originally Posted by Oakbank View Post
    I've posted elsewhere about the Weather Compensation kit I fitted to my Ideal Logic Heat boiler. Today (14th Jan) I submitted meter reading prior to tomorrows tariff increase. The PP app immediately came back with a "Reading lower than expected" message under the gas reading.
    I entered the new values into my energy tracking spreadsheet to see by how much my gas consumption has been reduced. The result is quite dramatic.

    Average consumption for December. 519 cuft/day = £4.47/day
    Average consumption 5th ~ 14 Jan. 449 cuft/day = £3.87/day

    Now a 60p/day saving might not sound all that much, but it's a lot of money over an entire year. For me it's like a free month of gas and electricity! (sorry PP )

    Now here's the biggie. When spending money to improve your home's energy efficiency you have to consider the payback period.

    For me, double glazing is not financially viable. Even if the local planning eejits gave me permission, the payback period would be measured in decades. I've already plugged all the gaps that let heat escape and cold air enter. The loft has a couple of feet of insulation and we even fitted underfloor insulation on the ground floor when we renovated the property and we have energy efficient lighting throughout.
    The net result has been a year-on-year reduction in energy consumption. Yeah!

    What's the payback period for Weather Compensation? Less than two months!

    My kit cost £21 and took only a couple of hours to fit (plus a couple of days 'tuning'). Even if you pay a central heating engineer to install weather compensation it should pay for itself in only a few months.

    If your boiler is suitable I can't recommend it enough.
    This is amazing, 60p a day is pretty impressive, it's 15% off your bill!

    After your post Im really considering getting one.
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  • Quote Originally Posted by Oakbank View Post
    I've posted elsewhere about the Weather Compensation kit I fitted to my Ideal Logic Heat boiler. Today (14th Jan) I submitted meter reading prior to tomorrows tariff increase. The PP app immediately came back with a "Reading lower than expected" message under the gas reading.
    I entered the new values into my energy tracking spreadsheet to see by how much my gas consumption has been reduced. The result is quite dramatic.

    Average consumption for December. 519 cuft/day = £4.47/day
    Average consumption 5th ~ 14 Jan. 449 cuft/day = £3.87/day

    Now a 60p/day saving might not sound all that much, but it's a lot of money over an entire year. For me it's like a free month of gas and electricity! (sorry PP )

    Now here's the biggie. When spending money to improve your home's energy efficiency you have to consider the payback period.

    For me, double glazing is not financially viable. Even if the local planning eejits gave me permission, the payback period would be measured in decades. I've already plugged all the gaps that let heat escape and cold air enter. The loft has a couple of feet of insulation and we even fitted underfloor insulation on the ground floor when we renovated the property and we have energy efficient lighting throughout.
    The net result has been a year-on-year reduction in energy consumption. Yeah!

    What's the payback period for Weather Compensation? Less than two months!

    My kit cost £21 and took only a couple of hours to fit (plus a couple of days 'tuning'). Even if you pay a central heating engineer to install weather compensation it should pay for itself in only a few months.

    If your boiler is suitable I can't recommend it enough.
    This is amazing, 60p a day is pretty impressive, it's 15% off your bill!

    After your post Im really considering getting one.
  • For cavity wall insulation, try and get an independent inspection of your cavity done first. They drill a hole on the external wall and use a camera/scope to have a look around in there. Just 1 wall tie that is caked in mortar and therefore bridges the gap between the external and internal walls has the potential to cause huge damp problems in that area the future.

    Yes you would save money on heating bills by having cavity wall insulation, but if it caused a damp problem you might never retrospectively find what caused the damp and actually be in a far worse position.

    I was advised by an independent assessor to not have the insulation retrofitted for precisely this reason.
    1
  • For cavity wall insulation, try and get an independent inspection of your cavity done first. They drill a hole on the external wall and use a camera/scope to have a look around in there. Just 1 wall tie that is caked in mortar and therefore bridges the gap between the external and internal walls has the potential to cause huge damp problems in that area the future.

    Yes you would save money on heating bills by having cavity wall insulation, but if it caused a damp problem you might never retrospectively find what caused the damp and actually be in a far worse position.

    I was advised by an independent assessor to not have the insulation retrofitted for precisely this reason.
  • Quote Originally Posted by woz View Post
    Any Technology which is connected to a network (be it the internet or a local network) tends to use a lot more energy on standby.

    My energy saving tip is to get the standing consumption of your home as low as possible. Anything that's on 24/365¼ adds up, and now with smart TVs and smart everything else, standing consumption is increasing.
    We're going backwards!

    Happy New Year to all!
    It shouldn’t really - computers and some other hardware has the ability to wake up over the network but the energy pull for that is minuscule.

    The big offenders are thinks like sky boxes - they use a ridiculous amount and the difference between ‘standby’ and ‘on’ is virtually nothing.

    I know our Xbox has different oower settings. I usually leave it on it’s highest energy saving settings which means it takes longer to load up.

    Agree about smart TV’a though - they can use a lot of power in use (but almost nothing in standby)
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  • Quote Originally Posted by woz View Post
    Any Technology which is connected to a network (be it the internet or a local network) tends to use a lot more energy on standby.

    My energy saving tip is to get the standing consumption of your home as low as possible. Anything that's on 24/365¼ adds up, and now with smart TVs and smart everything else, standing consumption is increasing.
    We're going backwards!

    Happy New Year to all!
    It shouldn’t really - computers and some other hardware has the ability to wake up over the network but the energy pull for that is minuscule.

    The big offenders are thinks like sky boxes - they use a ridiculous amount and the difference between ‘standby’ and ‘on’ is virtually nothing.

    I know our Xbox has different oower settings. I usually leave it on it’s highest energy saving settings which means it takes longer to load up.

    Agree about smart TV’a though - they can use a lot of power in use (but almost nothing in standby)
  • The issue isn't "almost nothing", it's "almost nothing" for 24 hours a day 365 days a year.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jowl View Post
    It shouldn’t really - computers and some other hardware has the ability to wake up over the network but the energy pull for that is minuscule.

    The big offenders are thinks like sky boxes - they use a ridiculous amount and the difference between ‘standby’ and ‘on’ is virtually nothing.

    I know our Xbox has different oower settings. I usually leave it on it’s highest energy saving settings which means it takes longer to load up.

    Agree about smart TV’a though - they can use a lot of power in use (but almost nothing in standby)
    0
  • The issue isn't "almost nothing", it's "almost nothing" for 24 hours a day 365 days a year.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jowl View Post
    It shouldn’t really - computers and some other hardware has the ability to wake up over the network but the energy pull for that is minuscule.

    The big offenders are thinks like sky boxes - they use a ridiculous amount and the difference between ‘standby’ and ‘on’ is virtually nothing.

    I know our Xbox has different oower settings. I usually leave it on it’s highest energy saving settings which means it takes longer to load up.

    Agree about smart TV’a though - they can use a lot of power in use (but almost nothing in standby)
  • Quote Originally Posted by woz View Post
    The issue isn't "almost nothing", it's "almost nothing" for 24 hours a day 365 days a year.
    For a typical TV, it's 0.1w in standby power. Other than turning off at the wall, you can't get much lower! That's a lot better than the old CRT equivilent.
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  • Quote Originally Posted by woz View Post
    The issue isn't "almost nothing", it's "almost nothing" for 24 hours a day 365 days a year.
    For a typical TV, it's 0.1w in standby power. Other than turning off at the wall, you can't get much lower! That's a lot better than the old CRT equivilent.