• Nissan Leaf 2 review: Apps and maps - how and where do I charge it when on the road?

    My daily commute to work is 15 miles each way which makes an EV a good option for the majority of my time.

    But for longer journeys I’ve discovered that for the EV newbie a bit of forward planning is needed.

    I’m planning a trip to the Reading area later this week. It’ll be on top of my regular daily commute - so a combined round trip of about 150 miles.

    This will really be pushing the limit of what the Leaf can do on one charge.


    Two of the most popular apps for EV drivers are Zap Map and Polar.

    Zap Map is a map of the UK which shows all the public charging points. Looking at a map around Pure Planet’s HQ in Bath, England, I can see this confusing display of charging points.

    Name:  Zap Map all Bath to Reading.JPG
Views: 189
Size:  392.6 KB




    But then I can filter by charging type. I’m interested in the Rapid charge 50kW which the Nissan Leaf 2’s manual tells me will get the battery 80% full in 40 minutes.

    Name:  Zap Map rapid 50kw Bath to Reading.JPG
Views: 164
Size:  324.5 KB




    When I click or tap on each pin, it tells me whether it’s available to use right now.

    Name:  Zap Map Swindon rapid available to use.JPG
Views: 159
Size:  313.8 KB




    Zap Map also allows me to filter by different networks. Why is this?
    Well, not all charging points are standard. There are different operators running different networks, and different membership rules and fees apply.

    You may also like: Nissan Leaf 2 review - the basics for an EV newbie


    One of the most well known is Polar. This UK charging network boasts more than 6,500 charging points.

    For the purposes of my week of testing the Leaf 2, Nissan has already very kindly set me up with a Polar membership.
    This gives me access to Polar’s charging points - a special key fob is used to identify who I am. Otherwise it costs £7.85 a month to join Polar, but after that the “majority” of charges are free.


    So back to Zap Map, if I then filter my search for rapid chargers of 50kW operated by Polar, it looks like this:

    Name:  Zap map Bath to Reading rapid charge by Polar.JPG
Views: 158
Size:  168.9 KB


    Which makes me think I will make my journey to Reading, where I’m planning to visit a community member and then top up at one of the two charging points in the Reading before heading back. If they’re busy I’ll have to wait my turn!

    Both Zap Map and Polar have apps, so I will be able to check on availability on the day. The Leaf’s in-built sat nav also shows me the nearest charging points, too. This is what it was showing me around Bath this morning:

    Name:  Nissan Leaf 2 nearest charging stations.JPG
Views: 166
Size:  54.1 KB




    What could possibly go wrong?

    Looping in @woz who has also pointed out there are
    many other apps to find charging points not mentioned here.

    And @Brunel also recommends
    PodPoint which offers free charging with their app.
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    2
  • My daily commute to work is 15 miles each way which makes an EV a good option for the majority of my time.

    But for longer journeys I’ve discovered that for the EV newbie a bit of forward planning is needed.

    I’m planning a trip to the Reading area later this week. It’ll be on top of my regular daily commute - so a combined round trip of about 150 miles.

    This will really be pushing the limit of what the Leaf can do on one charge.


    Two of the most popular apps for EV drivers are Zap Map and Polar.

    Zap Map is a map of the UK which shows all the public charging points. Looking at a map around Pure Planet’s HQ in Bath, England, I can see this confusing display of charging points.

    Name:  Zap Map all Bath to Reading.JPG
Views: 189
Size:  392.6 KB




    But then I can filter by charging type. I’m interested in the Rapid charge 50kW which the Nissan Leaf 2’s manual tells me will get the battery 80% full in 40 minutes.

    Name:  Zap Map rapid 50kw Bath to Reading.JPG
Views: 164
Size:  324.5 KB




    When I click or tap on each pin, it tells me whether it’s available to use right now.

    Name:  Zap Map Swindon rapid available to use.JPG
Views: 159
Size:  313.8 KB




    Zap Map also allows me to filter by different networks. Why is this?
    Well, not all charging points are standard. There are different operators running different networks, and different membership rules and fees apply.

    You may also like: Nissan Leaf 2 review - the basics for an EV newbie


    One of the most well known is Polar. This UK charging network boasts more than 6,500 charging points.

    For the purposes of my week of testing the Leaf 2, Nissan has already very kindly set me up with a Polar membership.
    This gives me access to Polar’s charging points - a special key fob is used to identify who I am. Otherwise it costs £7.85 a month to join Polar, but after that the “majority” of charges are free.


    So back to Zap Map, if I then filter my search for rapid chargers of 50kW operated by Polar, it looks like this:

    Name:  Zap map Bath to Reading rapid charge by Polar.JPG
Views: 158
Size:  168.9 KB


    Which makes me think I will make my journey to Reading, where I’m planning to visit a community member and then top up at one of the two charging points in the Reading before heading back. If they’re busy I’ll have to wait my turn!

    Both Zap Map and Polar have apps, so I will be able to check on availability on the day. The Leaf’s in-built sat nav also shows me the nearest charging points, too. This is what it was showing me around Bath this morning:

    Name:  Nissan Leaf 2 nearest charging stations.JPG
Views: 166
Size:  54.1 KB




    What could possibly go wrong?

    Looping in @woz who has also pointed out there are
    many other apps to find charging points not mentioned here.

    And @Brunel also recommends
    PodPoint which offers free charging with their app.
    Community Manager - Pure Planet