• Nissan Leaf 2 review - the basics for an EV newbie

    Name:  Nissan Leaf 2 front.JPG
Views: 368
Size:  72.7 KB


    The Nissan Leaf 2 arrived yesterday. This is what I’ve learned so far, in my first 24 hours.


    The car was delivered by a nice chap from Nissan on Monday. He called about an hour before delivery to let me know that he was ‘topping up’ at a charging point about 14 miles away, just so it wouldn’t be too close to empty when it arrived.

    When he got to mine there was about 70 miles left on the battery. Immediately I worried about charging. How is it done? Will it work? As I’ve got the Leaf for only a week, I haven’t applied for any Government grants (something I hear EV owners talk about it) to buy a home charging kit (also known as ‘pods’).

    No probs, said the man from Nissan. The Leaf comes with two ‘plug sockets’. They live at the front of the car, in a small flap.

    Name:  Nissan Leaf 2 charging.JPG
Views: 354
Size:  38.6 KB



    The socket on the left is for ‘rapid’ charging at roadside charge points. I’ll be finding out about this over the next few days when I hit the road for longer journeys.

    For now though, the socket on the right is the one for me. This is the ‘slow’ charging point, for overnight charging from a regular wall socket.

    Luckily, where I live I have a drive and a garage with an electric wall socket, so I’m able to easily charge the Leaf overnight. If I lived in a flat or a house without off-street parking, it would be a case of getting a very long lead.

    With the charger lead found in the boot (very roomy) I stuck it in my garage wall socket, and connected the other, rounded end to the Leaf. Immediately three blue lights on the screen started to blink, indicating that the car was being charged (much like a battery indicator on a smart phone starts to move when it’s charging).

    Relieved that it seemed to work, I decided to unplug the Leaf and take it for its first spin. The charger wouldn’t come out. It really just would not budge. Ten minutes, some manual flicking and a few Google searches later, it turns out there’s a charger release button on the key fob. Makes sense - to stop anyone from randomly, or accidentally (or maliciously) unplugging your charger. I guess it was a newbie schoolboy error.

    How do you drive the Nissan Electric Leaf 2?

    Like most modern cars, there’s a power button to press rather than using a key. Once the power is on, it sounds like….. Nothing. Zero sound. Eerie.

    In answer to a question from @Bev about how the pedals differ to normal cars. It’s also an automatic, so two pedals - one on the left for braking, the one on the right for accelerating. Except, the Leaf 2 has a feature called the ‘e-pedal’. Switch this on, and the accelerator doubles as the brakes! It accelerates as usual when depressed, but when you lift your foot to slow down it actually applies the brakes too.

    Name:  Nissan Leaf 2 interior.JPG
Views: 349
Size:  58.2 KB



    The e-pedal is said to be more battery-efficient, because the added braking from the motor means you have to use the actual brake less, effectively reducing wasted energy. It will take some getting used to. Luckily it can be switched off (looping in @woz who wanted to know this).

    There’s also an ‘Eco’ button which is supposed to deliver more range - that is, more miles and battery efficiency. The Leaf 2 is such a nippy car (acceleration is 7.9 seconds to get from 0-62mph) that I found this a bit sluggish, so have switched it off for now.

    Apart from the odd e-pedal, driving the Leaf 2 feels straightforward. The ‘gear stick’ is round and flat. But only use it to change to ‘Drive’ or ‘Reverse’ mode. To get into neutral you press the ‘P’ button in the middle, which is ‘Park’ mode.

    Name:  Nissan Leaf 2 gearstick.JPG
Views: 335
Size:  40.6 KB



    The last thing I did last night was plug the charger back in. It takes about 14 hours to charge it completely from a 'normal' 3kW three-pin wall socket to get the battery back to 100%. [NOTE this has been updated, as charging info originally stated that the slow charger was 6.6kW].

    This morning the dashboard told me I have a 155 mile range. Which for my daily commute, is way more than I need.


    On a single charge, the Leaf 2 officially has a range of 168 miles, using the WLTP (Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicle Test Procedure) benchmark.

    You may also like: Nissan Leaf 2 - apps and maps and how charge it when on the road

    Over the next few days I’ll be finding out what all the different EV apps to; how to find the right charger when on the road; how good is the Leaf for hitting the shops or going away; how owners can get a home charging point; should I buy one. We will also be looking at fuel efficiency and the cost of charging the Leaf with Pure Planet as your home supplier.

    Got any questions about the Leaf 2 which I can help answer? Get them in the replies below.

    Last edited by Marc; 10-08-18 at 09:43. Reason: Correction about charger wattage
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    6
  • Name:  Nissan Leaf 2 front.JPG
Views: 368
Size:  72.7 KB


    The Nissan Leaf 2 arrived yesterday. This is what I’ve learned so far, in my first 24 hours.


    The car was delivered by a nice chap from Nissan on Monday. He called about an hour before delivery to let me know that he was ‘topping up’ at a charging point about 14 miles away, just so it wouldn’t be too close to empty when it arrived.

    When he got to mine there was about 70 miles left on the battery. Immediately I worried about charging. How is it done? Will it work? As I’ve got the Leaf for only a week, I haven’t applied for any Government grants (something I hear EV owners talk about it) to buy a home charging kit (also known as ‘pods’).

    No probs, said the man from Nissan. The Leaf comes with two ‘plug sockets’. They live at the front of the car, in a small flap.

    Name:  Nissan Leaf 2 charging.JPG
Views: 354
Size:  38.6 KB



    The socket on the left is for ‘rapid’ charging at roadside charge points. I’ll be finding out about this over the next few days when I hit the road for longer journeys.

    For now though, the socket on the right is the one for me. This is the ‘slow’ charging point, for overnight charging from a regular wall socket.

    Luckily, where I live I have a drive and a garage with an electric wall socket, so I’m able to easily charge the Leaf overnight. If I lived in a flat or a house without off-street parking, it would be a case of getting a very long lead.

    With the charger lead found in the boot (very roomy) I stuck it in my garage wall socket, and connected the other, rounded end to the Leaf. Immediately three blue lights on the screen started to blink, indicating that the car was being charged (much like a battery indicator on a smart phone starts to move when it’s charging).

    Relieved that it seemed to work, I decided to unplug the Leaf and take it for its first spin. The charger wouldn’t come out. It really just would not budge. Ten minutes, some manual flicking and a few Google searches later, it turns out there’s a charger release button on the key fob. Makes sense - to stop anyone from randomly, or accidentally (or maliciously) unplugging your charger. I guess it was a newbie schoolboy error.

    How do you drive the Nissan Electric Leaf 2?

    Like most modern cars, there’s a power button to press rather than using a key. Once the power is on, it sounds like….. Nothing. Zero sound. Eerie.

    In answer to a question from @Bev about how the pedals differ to normal cars. It’s also an automatic, so two pedals - one on the left for braking, the one on the right for accelerating. Except, the Leaf 2 has a feature called the ‘e-pedal’. Switch this on, and the accelerator doubles as the brakes! It accelerates as usual when depressed, but when you lift your foot to slow down it actually applies the brakes too.

    Name:  Nissan Leaf 2 interior.JPG
Views: 349
Size:  58.2 KB



    The e-pedal is said to be more battery-efficient, because the added braking from the motor means you have to use the actual brake less, effectively reducing wasted energy. It will take some getting used to. Luckily it can be switched off (looping in @woz who wanted to know this).

    There’s also an ‘Eco’ button which is supposed to deliver more range - that is, more miles and battery efficiency. The Leaf 2 is such a nippy car (acceleration is 7.9 seconds to get from 0-62mph) that I found this a bit sluggish, so have switched it off for now.

    Apart from the odd e-pedal, driving the Leaf 2 feels straightforward. The ‘gear stick’ is round and flat. But only use it to change to ‘Drive’ or ‘Reverse’ mode. To get into neutral you press the ‘P’ button in the middle, which is ‘Park’ mode.

    Name:  Nissan Leaf 2 gearstick.JPG
Views: 335
Size:  40.6 KB



    The last thing I did last night was plug the charger back in. It takes about 14 hours to charge it completely from a 'normal' 3kW three-pin wall socket to get the battery back to 100%. [NOTE this has been updated, as charging info originally stated that the slow charger was 6.6kW].

    This morning the dashboard told me I have a 155 mile range. Which for my daily commute, is way more than I need.


    On a single charge, the Leaf 2 officially has a range of 168 miles, using the WLTP (Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicle Test Procedure) benchmark.

    You may also like: Nissan Leaf 2 - apps and maps and how charge it when on the road

    Over the next few days I’ll be finding out what all the different EV apps to; how to find the right charger when on the road; how good is the Leaf for hitting the shops or going away; how owners can get a home charging point; should I buy one. We will also be looking at fuel efficiency and the cost of charging the Leaf with Pure Planet as your home supplier.

    Got any questions about the Leaf 2 which I can help answer? Get them in the replies below.

    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • @Marc not sure if you are plugging straight into wall socket or using extension lead. If the latter do unwind it fully so it does not get to hot. Ideal extension leads are thicker than usual and always unwound!
    1
  • @Marc not sure if you are plugging straight into wall socket or using extension lead. If the latter do unwind it fully so it does not get to hot. Ideal extension leads are thicker than usual and always unwound!
  • That is a very good point. More than a few house fires (fireman friend says) have been pinned on extension leads that are wound up to make them look tidy, and as brunel says the heat build up is surprising and can cause a blaze.if its plugged into a normal socket surly a breaker socket would be sensible.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon1 View Post
    That is a very good point. More than a few house fires (fireman friend says) have been pinned on extension leads that are wound up to make them look tidy, and as brunel says the heat build up is surprising and can cause a blaze.if its plugged into a normal socket surly a breaker socket would be sensible.
    Available from any good b@q
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    0
  • That is a very good point. More than a few house fires (fireman friend says) have been pinned on extension leads that are wound up to make them look tidy, and as brunel says the heat build up is surprising and can cause a blaze.if its plugged into a normal socket surly a breaker socket would be sensible.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon1 View Post
    That is a very good point. More than a few house fires (fireman friend says) have been pinned on extension leads that are wound up to make them look tidy, and as brunel says the heat build up is surprising and can cause a blaze.if its plugged into a normal socket surly a breaker socket would be sensible.
    Available from any good b@q
    Attached Images Attached Images  
  • Seriously had absolutely zero idea of what the Leaf looked like, so seeing these photographs has made me think “Wowsa what a beauty!” Seriously lovely looking, sporty car! Mega impresssive! Love it, really do! . Nice bungalows!
    Peace is always beautiful.

    WALT WHITMAN
    0
  • Seriously had absolutely zero idea of what the Leaf looked like, so seeing these photographs has made me think “Wowsa what a beauty!” Seriously lovely looking, sporty car! Mega impresssive! Love it, really do! . Nice bungalows!
    Peace is always beautiful.

    WALT WHITMAN
  • Quote Originally Posted by Jon1 View Post
    That is a very good point. More than a few house fires (fireman friend says) have been pinned on extension leads that are wound up to make them look tidy, and as brunel says the heat build up is surprising and can cause a blaze.if its plugged into a normal socket surly a breaker socket would be sensible.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Available from any good b@q
    Just to point out that what you've posted is an earth leakage breaker (RCD) which is designed primarily to prevent electric shock and not a thermal or overcurrent breaker. It trips out if it senses an imbalance between Live and Neutral and assumes if there is an imbalance then the difference in current must be flowing to earth, possibly through a human body.

    That said many if not most extension leads have built in thermal/overcurrent cut-outs for the very reason mentioned

    I agree you must uncoil extension leads, but in the case of using one for EV charging, many extension leads for price and size reasons are only rated at 10A. (In fact I've just bought one which has 4 13A sockets but is rated at 10A)
    I can't find a reliable figure for the leaf when running off a domestic 13A plug, one site quoted 2.3kW which is just short of 10A,
    If I was going to use an extension lead for EV charging I'd get the shortest one with the best rated cable.
    If you can get away lengthwise with a non-coiled type with thicker cable better to use that.
    I think charging off a 13A socket isn't really recommended as a long term solution anyway, despite 13A ratings pins tarnish, contact isn't always perfect and lets face it, you wouldn't really contemplate leaving a kettle on for 10 hours every day (heat stress not cost).


    Edit: Of course you shouldn't run an extension cable outside unless it's protected by RCD protection, which most modern houses have in their Consumer units (fuseboard) and which protect many circuits at the same time.
    The only possible advantage of running an extra one if you are already protected is that it might (note might) trip before the one in the house does so all the electric won't go off.
    Last edited by woz; 07-08-18 at 23:26.
    0
  • Quote Originally Posted by Jon1 View Post
    That is a very good point. More than a few house fires (fireman friend says) have been pinned on extension leads that are wound up to make them look tidy, and as brunel says the heat build up is surprising and can cause a blaze.if its plugged into a normal socket surly a breaker socket would be sensible.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Available from any good b@q
    Just to point out that what you've posted is an earth leakage breaker (RCD) which is designed primarily to prevent electric shock and not a thermal or overcurrent breaker. It trips out if it senses an imbalance between Live and Neutral and assumes if there is an imbalance then the difference in current must be flowing to earth, possibly through a human body.

    That said many if not most extension leads have built in thermal/overcurrent cut-outs for the very reason mentioned

    I agree you must uncoil extension leads, but in the case of using one for EV charging, many extension leads for price and size reasons are only rated at 10A. (In fact I've just bought one which has 4 13A sockets but is rated at 10A)
    I can't find a reliable figure for the leaf when running off a domestic 13A plug, one site quoted 2.3kW which is just short of 10A,
    If I was going to use an extension lead for EV charging I'd get the shortest one with the best rated cable.
    If you can get away lengthwise with a non-coiled type with thicker cable better to use that.
    I think charging off a 13A socket isn't really recommended as a long term solution anyway, despite 13A ratings pins tarnish, contact isn't always perfect and lets face it, you wouldn't really contemplate leaving a kettle on for 10 hours every day (heat stress not cost).


    Edit: Of course you shouldn't run an extension cable outside unless it's protected by RCD protection, which most modern houses have in their Consumer units (fuseboard) and which protect many circuits at the same time.
    The only possible advantage of running an extra one if you are already protected is that it might (note might) trip before the one in the house does so all the electric won't go off.
  • No idea woz just the first picture that popped up when asking google.
    0
  • No idea woz just the first picture that popped up when asking google.
  • hi jon
    I wasn't being critical, just wanted to point that out for those who might not know.
    Name:  elf'nsafetea.jpg
Views: 314
Size:  11.1 KB


    (elf 'n safe tea an all that)
    0
  • hi jon
    I wasn't being critical, just wanted to point that out for those who might not know.
    Name:  elf'nsafetea.jpg
Views: 314
Size:  11.1 KB


    (elf 'n safe tea an all that)
  • Good shout @Brunel I'll make sure it's fully unwound
    This is the lead Nissan have loaned me for overnight charging - it takes about 7.5 hours (though I didn't need it last night, still got more than 100 miles on the battery!)

    Name:  Nissan Leaf 2 charger.JPG
Views: 292
Size:  125.9 KB



    Quote Originally Posted by Brunel View Post
    @Marc not sure if you are plugging straight into wall socket or using extension lead. If the latter do unwind it fully so it does not get to hot. Ideal extension leads are thicker than usual and always unwound!
    Last edited by Marc; 08-08-18 at 14:38.
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    0
  • Good shout @Brunel I'll make sure it's fully unwound
    This is the lead Nissan have loaned me for overnight charging - it takes about 7.5 hours (though I didn't need it last night, still got more than 100 miles on the battery!)

    Name:  Nissan Leaf 2 charger.JPG
Views: 292
Size:  125.9 KB



    Quote Originally Posted by Brunel View Post
    @Marc not sure if you are plugging straight into wall socket or using extension lead. If the latter do unwind it fully so it does not get to hot. Ideal extension leads are thicker than usual and always unwound!
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • It is attractive @Bev
    I'm giving serious thought to leasing one. But I'd better wait until I've tested it for a whole week!
    At a risk of going a bit off-topic, are you a bungalow fan?!

    Quote Originally Posted by Bev View Post
    Seriously had absolutely zero idea of what the Leaf looked like, so seeing these photographs has made me think “Wowsa what a beauty!” Seriously lovely looking, sporty car! Mega impresssive! Love it, really do! . Nice bungalows!
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    1
  • It is attractive @Bev
    I'm giving serious thought to leasing one. But I'd better wait until I've tested it for a whole week!
    At a risk of going a bit off-topic, are you a bungalow fan?!

    Quote Originally Posted by Bev View Post
    Seriously had absolutely zero idea of what the Leaf looked like, so seeing these photographs has made me think “Wowsa what a beauty!” Seriously lovely looking, sporty car! Mega impresssive! Love it, really do! . Nice bungalows!
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • Could I tow a trailer
    0
  • Could I tow a trailer
  • As far as I can see in the spec, the Leaf is not type approved for towing.
    No doubt Nissan will shed more light.
    The brochure does not list a towing weight (Although I'll bet it's more than capable torque wise)
    There's an interesting article HERE
    0
  • As far as I can see in the spec, the Leaf is not type approved for towing.
    No doubt Nissan will shed more light.
    The brochure does not list a towing weight (Although I'll bet it's more than capable torque wise)
    There's an interesting article HERE
  • I'm going to check the manual. Will find out and come back to you on that!
    Quote Originally Posted by GSummers View Post
    Could I tow a trailer
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    0
  • I'm going to check the manual. Will find out and come back to you on that!
    Quote Originally Posted by GSummers View Post
    Could I tow a trailer
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • Quote Originally Posted by woz View Post
    hi jon
    I wasn't being critical, just wanted to point that out for those who might not know.
    Name:  elf'nsafetea.jpg
Views: 314
Size:  11.1 KB


    (elf 'n safe tea an all that)
    Peace is always beautiful.

    WALT WHITMAN
    0
  • Quote Originally Posted by woz View Post
    hi jon
    I wasn't being critical, just wanted to point that out for those who might not know.
    Name:  elf'nsafetea.jpg
Views: 314
Size:  11.1 KB


    (elf 'n safe tea an all that)
    Peace is always beautiful.

    WALT WHITMAN
  • Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    It is attractive @Bev
    I'm giving serious thought to leasing one. But I'd better wait until I've tested it for a whole week!
    At a risk of going a bit off-topic, are you a bungalow fan?!
    Absolutely Marc . Think be my ultimate dream home, especially if by the sea! Can dream!
    Peace is always beautiful.

    WALT WHITMAN
    1
  • Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    It is attractive @Bev
    I'm giving serious thought to leasing one. But I'd better wait until I've tested it for a whole week!
    At a risk of going a bit off-topic, are you a bungalow fan?!
    Absolutely Marc . Think be my ultimate dream home, especially if by the sea! Can dream!
    Peace is always beautiful.

    WALT WHITMAN
  • Thinking of longer journeys, what would it be like for drinks, food etc? ie The important things like drinks holders, pull down trays on back of seats etc, things like that Marc?

    Crucially, a serious question from a passenger point of view; if really smooth quiet drive, does this improve the likelihood of less travel sickness?
    Peace is always beautiful.

    WALT WHITMAN
    0
  • Thinking of longer journeys, what would it be like for drinks, food etc? ie The important things like drinks holders, pull down trays on back of seats etc, things like that Marc?

    Crucially, a serious question from a passenger point of view; if really smooth quiet drive, does this improve the likelihood of less travel sickness?
    Peace is always beautiful.

    WALT WHITMAN
  • Got a long trip planned for today @Bev
    Good questions there. I will report back!


    Quote Originally Posted by Bev View Post
    Thinking of longer journeys, what would it be like for drinks, food etc? ie The important things like drinks holders, pull down trays on back of seats etc, things like that Marc?

    Crucially, a serious question from a passenger point of view; if really smooth quiet drive, does this improve the likelihood of less travel sickness?
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    1
  • Got a long trip planned for today @Bev
    Good questions there. I will report back!


    Quote Originally Posted by Bev View Post
    Thinking of longer journeys, what would it be like for drinks, food etc? ie The important things like drinks holders, pull down trays on back of seats etc, things like that Marc?

    Crucially, a serious question from a passenger point of view; if really smooth quiet drive, does this improve the likelihood of less travel sickness?
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • Hi @GSummers
    Checked the Leaf's manual last night. Lots of info about being towed, but none on whether it can tow a trailer (or anything else)
    According to the RAC, it is possible to tow using EVs, but they're not approved to.

    So I think that's a no!

    Quote Originally Posted by GSummers View Post
    Could I tow a trailer
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    0
  • Hi @GSummers
    Checked the Leaf's manual last night. Lots of info about being towed, but none on whether it can tow a trailer (or anything else)
    According to the RAC, it is possible to tow using EVs, but they're not approved to.

    So I think that's a no!

    Quote Originally Posted by GSummers View Post
    Could I tow a trailer
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

  • WoWEE!!! Nice set of Hot Wheels. Not keen on white, cos when the mud splashes on the boot or front of car, some bright spark will write on the car Please Wash Me Now. I have seen this on many cars n vans. Quite funny what some people write on muddy cars. Red cars have more accidents, apparently its a well known fact by Insurance Companies.

    My scooter was nearly taken away by Dealership Me hanic, to do with PIP benefit problems. So I phoned Motability, had a long chat, I can keep George until October, by which time hopefully the Appeal will be more favourable. I was worried I would have to be housebound. This can happen just cos DWP can do what they want.

    Anyway you have a really FAB toy, take of your car, its exiting when you are finding out about a new car or techy toy, my iPad, boy its such a good help. My S7 was a nightmare to learn, but I got the hang now.

    Are you gonna try driving abroad? What if France or other countries don’t have an electric port thingy? I hope you will be very happy with your new car, yep EV are the best thing out, next new invention, flying cars in the air by levitating, like in SciFi film.

    Beam me up Scottie!!!
    Last edited by Kniterella; 09-08-18 at 20:05.
    Peace and Luve

    Yours in Stitches

    Ory 🌏🌞
    0
  • WoWEE!!! Nice set of Hot Wheels. Not keen on white, cos when the mud splashes on the boot or front of car, some bright spark will write on the car Please Wash Me Now. I have seen this on many cars n vans. Quite funny what some people write on muddy cars. Red cars have more accidents, apparently its a well known fact by Insurance Companies.

    My scooter was nearly taken away by Dealership Me hanic, to do with PIP benefit problems. So I phoned Motability, had a long chat, I can keep George until October, by which time hopefully the Appeal will be more favourable. I was worried I would have to be housebound. This can happen just cos DWP can do what they want.

    Anyway you have a really FAB toy, take of your car, its exiting when you are finding out about a new car or techy toy, my iPad, boy its such a good help. My S7 was a nightmare to learn, but I got the hang now.

    Are you gonna try driving abroad? What if France or other countries don’t have an electric port thingy? I hope you will be very happy with your new car, yep EV are the best thing out, next new invention, flying cars in the air by levitating, like in SciFi film.

    Beam me up Scottie!!!
    Peace and Luve

    Yours in Stitches

    Ory 🌏🌞
  • Marc I noticed on an earlier post that you said you were using the quick charger rated at 6.6kW.

    It can't be charging at that wattage because the maximum wattage which can safely be supplied by a 13A domestic socket is around 3kW.
    If you have a charging socket installed you would be able to charge at a higher wattage, your supply may need to be upgraded depending on the size of your main fuse, cable sizes etc.
    0
  • Marc I noticed on an earlier post that you said you were using the quick charger rated at 6.6kW.

    It can't be charging at that wattage because the maximum wattage which can safely be supplied by a 13A domestic socket is around 3kW.
    If you have a charging socket installed you would be able to charge at a higher wattage, your supply may need to be upgraded depending on the size of your main fuse, cable sizes etc.
  • Hey @woz
    Good spot!
    I meant 3kW of course. And it doesn't take 7 hours. More like 12 and a half. I will amend the post
    Thanks for letting me know.... It proves that I really am an EV newbie
    Community Manager - Pure Planet

    0
  • Hey @woz
    Good spot!
    I meant 3kW of course. And it doesn't take 7 hours. More like 12 and a half. I will amend the post
    Thanks for letting me know.... It proves that I really am an EV newbie
    Community Manager - Pure Planet