BBC "You and Yours" article on Dynamic Pricing

  • 10 May 2021
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Interesting article (or advertorial….) on Dynamic Pricing 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m000vxyn

Starts at 32 minutes 


6 replies

Octopus energy early mention there… 😉 

Seems to have got the folk thinking about avoiding wasting energy.

Oh, Octopus use notifications on iPhone — there’s a good idea!

Octopus CEO being interviewed — there’s a PP opportunity to roll out you know who…

Good Energy gets a mention, but no others doing this (yet)!

Thanks @woz 

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Costing the Earth just played out on BBC Radio 4 and may be worth a listen for some...

 

New Grid for the New Age

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000vwsc

@woz whats your opinion on Dynamic pricing?

Will the dynamics today change as we go forward where or will we reach a point where it makes no different.

All those EV’s charging up over night as we look ahead may not be as favourable.

Multiple grids makes it complicated and no doubt the market place is gonna change.

 

 

 

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@Strutt G I think it’s inevitable. It will (in my opinion) have to be used as a stick to beat consumers (rather than a carrot), because it will be a necessary tool to manage grid balancing.  If EV take-up gets anywhere near what’s necessary to meet the looming carbon targets the grid  won’t cope as there just isn’t the capacity to charge all of those vehicles at peak times, so charging will have to happen at times of low demand.

The corollary is that those who aren’t willing or can’t for practical reasons take advantage will inevitably be disadvantaged (and end up paying more). 

If you’re a night shift worker using your car you don’t have an option to charge at night, if you’re a working parent and  you want to cook dinner and feed and bathe and clothe  your kids you can’t do that at night either. 

If not thought out properly by Ofgem there will be casualties. My worry is that unless there is a lot more spent on grid infrastructure the losers will inevitably be the most vulnerable.

Inevitable as it is the cynic in me says that if it’s a choice of saving billions in infrastructure by leaning on energy users I think I know what will win.

 

 

 

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Cheers @woz and valid feedback. I was just pondering on peak time changing due to all those EV’s being charged overnight, but thats way off I guess. And yes its gonna keep getting harder for the disadvantaged.

@Strutt G I think it’s inevitable. It will (in my opinion) have to be used as a stick to beat consumers (rather than a carrot), because it will be a necessary tool to manage grid balancing.  If EV take-up gets anywhere near what’s necessary to meet the looming carbon targets the grid  won’t cope as there just isn’t the capacity to charge all of those vehicles at peak times, so charging will have to happen at times of low demand.

The corollary is that those who aren’t willing or can’t for practical reasons take advantage will inevitably be disadvantaged (and end up paying more). 

If you’re a night shift worker using your car you don’t have an option to charge at night, if you’re a working parent and  you want to cook dinner and feed and bathe and clothe  your kids you can’t do that at night either. 

If not thought out properly by Ofgem there will be casualties. My worry is that unless there is a lot more spent on grid infrastructure the losers will inevitably be the most vulnerable.

Inevitable as it is the cynic in me says that if it’s a choice of saving billions in infrastructure by leaning on energy users I think I know what will win.

 

This is really interesting @woz 

My uni dissertation is looking at this, as it’s of course PP related. In academic circles of energy and renewables there’s a ‘Scandanavian School’ of argument/debate/thought/research very much looking at the citizenship element of this. They are, of course, ahead of us in terms of the political frameworks, and they’ve got a lot of the infrastructure.

So the question of equality is v interesting. There’s a lot in this - the technology needs to be agnostic & interoperable, it needs to be affordable, available. And you also need the ‘market’ to drive it too, it seems in the UK at least.

Yesterday evening I was involved in onlne meeting about solar panels where I live (more on that soon, in a seperate thread I think) and one thing that came up was anyone whose property’s roof space is North-facing, or is a listed building, or is not a house!, or has something looking over it, is basically disqualified from getting PVs. 

In a local swimming pool (car park), they recently installed a car charging point with much disruption. I thought it’s not going to get much use, but whilst walking past I often see people charge. One parked (oddly not in the bay due to the location of the attachment point on the car) and unoccupied and another recently with a Tesla owner sitting there in the car whilst it charged.

So, my point is, things change, behaviours change — we adapt. 

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