Question

homecare

  • 15 January 2021
  • 11 replies
  • 78 views

Userlevel 4

Hi all 

 

this is my first house and so apologies for the potential stupid question, but I’ve no idea. 
 

would anyone recommend home care for boiler care and annual service? Or is there another provider you would recommend?  
 

many thanks


11 replies

Hi @Lapa,

Welcome! It’s down to personal preference. Some things to consider:

  • Do you have a cash buffer to pay for unexpected repairs?
  • Is the boiler quite new?
  • Is it under warranty?
  • How risk averse are you?
  • Are you happy to pay for peace of mind?

I’ve not answered you question sorry. I’m in the pay when I need it as it works out cheaper in the long run camp. Other views are available. 😉 

 

Userlevel 7
Badge +9

Hi @Lapa 

It's exciting - and a bit scary - to be in your first house, isn't it?

The answer to your question in principle depends on how you feel about risk. I too am in the pay when I need it as it works out cheaper in the long run camp, but I completely understand that some people prefer to pay to have peace of mind.

I do make sure I've got home emergency cover on my home insurance - that's paid for sorting out a wasp nest, emergency security after a break-in, and mice in the kitchen over the past couple of years, so I'm happy I've had my money's worth there - and I make sure boiler cover is included in case of a complete breakdown.

And boilers should be serviced every year, and if that's included in your cover that can be the cheapest way of getting it done. It's not impossible for the cost of a boiler service to be the same as home cover that includes a boiler service.

Pure Planet have linked with Hometree. I've no personal experience of them, but on the app you should have a planet/button that says boiler and home care. That might be worth exploring.

Enjoy your new home!

Stephen

@Lapa Some of the Homecare packages are quite expensive. British Gas charge £234 per annum. Meant to include servicing etc. Bearing in mind nothing should go wrong for a few years you may find you pay them more than the cost of replacing the boiler every few years! Which then works out cheaper.

Often a well recommended local man is better and cheaper.

Userlevel 4

Thank you all for your advice, much appreciated. I’ve just had my first bill bare in mind the boiler was only on for 48 hours think it may be cheaper to replace the boiler clearly not energy efficient 😂 

Your boiler may not be energy efficient but do remember you usually do not save money by simply putting a new boiler in for the cost of that can outweigh the energy savings. My boiler is 23 years old, it is on its last legs and replacement is looming but I know I will never recoup the capital cost of replacement with the reduced gas bills I may have. I also know that I am not likely to get the same life out of the replacement. Thus I never get back the running cost savings. I have had a BG “seller” telling me I would save the cost but his mathematical ability was somewhat limited.

Have a good thorough read of this site - https://www.theheatinghub.co.uk - I have no connection with it! The advice is sensible, it is independent, and I suggest you download the booklet they provide and read it. It will point you in the right direction. On that site they suggest three makes of boiler. One I had not heard of,  two I had and in my researches, they were already top of my list - Intergas and Viessmann. Yet, when I contact so called experts they proceed to knock such, they want to promote what they get the most commission from. Worcester Bosch have a very good reputation but they are expensive. You will find many installers promote them but they want to supply them and presumably they get commission for doing so.  A good Intergas system boiler, for example, that is adequate for say a 4 bedroom detached house costs a little over £800.

It is also crucial your installer knows not just how to connect the pipes but how to balance the boiler, tune it. Most have no idea about this.

But do remember, if you want to put a new boiler in then you will not recover the cost. In my case I may have to replace. It, like me, is getting long in the tooth, but whilst I can replace the boiler I can't replace myself.

Userlevel 4

Your boiler may not be energy efficient but do remember you usually do not save money by simply putting a new boiler in for the cost of that can outweigh the energy savings. My boiler is 23 years old, it is on its last legs and replacement is looming but I know I will never recoup the capital cost of replacement with the reduced gas bills I may have. I also know that I am not likely to get the same life out of the replacement. Thus I never get back the running cost savings. I have had a BG “seller” telling me I would save the cost but his mathematical ability was somewhat limited.

Have a good thorough read of this site - https://www.theheatinghub.co.uk - I have no connection with it! The advice is sensible, it is independent, and I suggest you download the booklet they provide and read it. It will point you in the right direction. On that site they suggest three makes of boiler. One I had not heard of,  two I had and in my researches, they were already top of my list - Intergas and Viessmann. Yet, when I contact so called experts they proceed to knock such, they want to promote what they get the most commission from. Worcester Bosch have a very good reputation but they are expensive. You will find many installers promote them but they want to supply them and presumably they get commission for doing so.  A good Intergas system boiler, for example, that is adequate for say a 4 bedroom detached house costs a little over £800.

It is also crucial your installer knows not just how to connect the pipes but how to balance the boiler, tune it. Most have no idea about this.

But do remember, if you want to put a new boiler in then you will not recover the cost. In my case I may have to replace. It, like me, is getting long in the tooth, but whilst I can replace the boiler I can't replace myself.

Thank you that’s really helpful. The joys of being an adult 😂 

Userlevel 7
Badge +9

Thank you all for your advice, much appreciated. I’ve just had my first bill bare in mind the boiler was only on for 48 hours think it may be cheaper to replace the boiler clearly not energy efficient 😂 

Hi again,

If you are thinking of changing your boiler on the basis of 48 hours use (in the coldest weather of the year) I think it's worth a second thought.

Your post is a little confusing - your first statement comes after a month and shows your usage for a month. Your post therefore suggests you only had heating on for two days in the past month? Is that what you meant?

Only bother to answer if you want some more help!

Stephen

@Lapa Just remember that for most people putting a new boiler in does not save you money.

Userlevel 7
Badge +11

@Lapa

I concur with previous replies, but to add, given a few facts about the type and model of your boiler, and your running costs over a longer period it would be fairly easy to work out the options. Also it should be possible to find some efficiency figures.

To give you some idea of cold/warm split your daily gas use can easily be 10 times or more than the warmest months when compared to the coldest months.(depending on how your hot water is heated)

Unless your boiler is ancient and keeping the birds warm the gain in efficiency won’t be as great as you think.

Look at your insulation first.

Agreed. Double glazing, cavity insulation and 300mm of loft insulation are a minimum. If your double glazing is old it is possible it predates 2002 when Building Regulations changed and increased the required vacuum between the panes and also heat reflective qualities required. There is a science behind the optimum gap between panes.

You will also save if you have individual controls in each room such that rooms not needing heat are not heated. A thermostat in the hall to control the whole house is not a practical approach.

If the boiler has to be replaced then how old are your radiators? In the past 15 years there has been better efficiency built into modern radiators. If you can afford them, aluminium are about the best water filled radiators - they need less water, heat up quicker and emit heat better. Also if you have older radiators and install a new condensing boiler your old radiators may suddenly start shedding a tear or two. Big tears in some cases. Joints are known to fail with the increased pressure of a new system.

Also a combi boiler may not always be the best approach.

However, the bottom line remains that if your current boiler is working and not in terminal decline, then it is cheaper to keep it, and as @woz has said improve your insulation. You may get a grant for the latter.

Hi @Lapa 

You’ve had some really great replies from other Members.

But I have to mention too that we’ve got a partnership with Hometree you might want to check out!

 

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