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Central heating

  • 15 January 2021
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Userlevel 1

Will it cost more to increase  the degrees of heat on my central heating please ? THANKYOU

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Best answer by G4RHL 16 January 2021, 08:55

If you dig around on the internet you will find some sites that tell you if you reduce your temperature by 1C your running costs (gas) drop by 10%. I am not sure but believe the starting point for this concept is 21C. Remember that if you drop 2C it is not a 20% drop but will be somewhere between that an 10%.

Generally we have all got used to having homes at higher temperatures. Many like it at 23c yet a few decades ago 18C was accepted. Some will remember the era when central heating was a luxury. As mentioned already jumpers were worn. Today many of us don’t. We have turned the temperature up.

However, there is a very useful document found on this site:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/how-much-energy-could-be-saved-by-making-small-changes-to-everyday-household-behaviours

Yes, it was prepared in 2012 but a lot of the information is relevant today

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Userlevel 7
Badge +8

Hi

Yes it will. .the boiler will have to work harder and longer to keep the increased temp. up, so use more kwh. Therefore will cost more .

Userlevel 7
Badge +8

The simple answer is yes, it will cost more. The higher the temperature, the longer the boiler has to work, so it will use more gas

Jumpers are great at this time of year and quite cheap to run. 😉 

Userlevel 7
Badge +8

Jumpers are great at this time of year and quite cheap to run. 😉 

🤣🤣🤣

Or maybe a hoodie?  🤣

Userlevel 7
Badge +9

Or even a Selkbag 😜🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

Userlevel 7
Badge +11

Will it cost more to increase  the degrees of heat on my central heating please ? THANKYOU

hi @Feebie23 

It will but how much more depends on how well insulated your home is.

May I ask why you asked this?

 

Badge +2

Hilarious @woz 🤣 

 

Yes, it definitely costs more @Feebie23 🔥🔥

 

 

Userlevel 7
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@LUCKY JO 

eh?...never mind...

Badge +2

Oops, sorry!!

If you dig around on the internet you will find some sites that tell you if you reduce your temperature by 1C your running costs (gas) drop by 10%. I am not sure but believe the starting point for this concept is 21C. Remember that if you drop 2C it is not a 20% drop but will be somewhere between that an 10%.

Generally we have all got used to having homes at higher temperatures. Many like it at 23c yet a few decades ago 18C was accepted. Some will remember the era when central heating was a luxury. As mentioned already jumpers were worn. Today many of us don’t. We have turned the temperature up.

However, there is a very useful document found on this site:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/how-much-energy-could-be-saved-by-making-small-changes-to-everyday-household-behaviours

Yes, it was prepared in 2012 but a lot of the information is relevant today

Userlevel 1

Thankyou so much  I asked because I am considering using my central heating rather than lighting my multifuel stoves (Two recept , two stoves ) Smokeless coal is expensive of course and I am trying to compare the two systems to see which would work out the most economical for me .At present I have the heating on for 3hrs early morning and 4hours late afternoon . I then  light both fires and retire to bed around 10pm , stoking up one fire to keep the  back room warm  all night (for the elderly dogs comfort ). My house has double glazing , Roof space well insulated , cable end wall insulated , Boiler about 3years old and efficient  

Userlevel 7
Badge +11

@Feebie23

I knew there would be a good reason for the question, but from your reply it transpires it was the wrong question…

so moving on from that…

It’s all about bang for your buck. Insulation is constant so how to compare boils down (if you’ll pardon the pun) to the cost of each kW of heat supplied by each method. You have to factor in the electricity costs too for running the pump.

If your boiler is modern it wouldn’t be unreasonable to assume that perhaps you are getting 80 to 85% efficiency from your gas and you know what each kW costs. (Plus perhaps allow 100W for the pump (not on all the time)

What you need to know is what the same level of heat you would get from your stoves costs.

https://blog.gr8fires.co.uk/2020/05/12/comparing-the-cost-of-running-a-woodburner-with-the-price-of-oil-gas-and-electricity-in-2020/

My gut feeling?

If you’re paying for the fuel in your stoves the boiler will work out cheaper or the same for the same level of temperature. My guess is that psychologically you’ve assumed that it’s cheaper to run the stoves and they are set to a higher level than you’d set the thermostat overnight on the heating. That’s the money part. My guess is based on what you wrote, from a comfort viewpoint you’d be happier with the stoves.

 

A friend has a log burner. It throws out so much heat he barely needs his central heating. Bring back open log fires so we can roast our nuts on them (chestnuts that is), toast marshmallows and bake the occasional spud. Enjoy the fumes of slowly burning seasoned wood. 

Userlevel 7
Badge +11

Further thought, @Feebie23 

You can figure out how much extra it costs 

Why not take meter readings for a week while using the burner, then do a week with the CH on at whatever level you deem to be about the same level of comfort.

 

Userlevel 2

As a plumbing and heating engineer. The answer is a big yes.

When we calculate radiator sizes they are worked out by using a size based on an outside air temp of minus one and a living temp inside of 21'c

So a given room size, with'x' outside walls , insulated walls, floor, whats above and below the room in question, cavity type and window type and size... Once all answers are given you get the radiator sizes... Plus 10% over…

Now here's the problem. When( not very often) the outside drops below minus 1 for a long period your radiators are working near their maximum output .

So if by turning up the room thermostat to 23'c you have now maxed everything out . The boiler will stay on to try and heat the area each radiator is fitted. If the room leaks heat out ,or let's the cold in then your burning money pointlessly. 

Ventilation is essential ( not a draft from bad Windows) 

Heat retention is vital ... Good insulation a must.

23'c is easily obtainable in a modern house( if built properly) but ask your self if you need to be that hot.

21'c is a nice T-Shirt weather summers evening. 23'c is really nice evening...25'c is a hot summers day in the UK .

@Bigholty ...and if you find 21c comfortable in July, then you ought to find 21c comfortable in December. Yet many turning the heating up because psychologically  they think it is cold, because it is winter, when the temperature is the same. Humidity levels have a bearing. How do I convince my wife that 21c in December is the same as 21c in July even when the humidity levels are similar?

Userlevel 2

The same here, my misses will turn the heating up on the thermostats on each radiator of the room she's in, she says the radiators are cold...my answer is but that means they are off because the room is hot enough...I can't win. So I bought 5 really big garden thermostats and hung them in the rooms she must often goes into , she sees they are 21'c ish ... She still turns them up...I did for a few winters put dummy thermostats on those radiators and install a nest thermostat, so I can monitor the whole up or downstairs.... It's set to 21'c she's never mentioned once that it was cold again... All the radiators are on 5 that's she's turned up... Some won't/ can't be told lol.…

Since we use our multifuel stove now the heating is very rarely on so that's solved a lot issues .....

I then  light both fires and retire to bed around 10pm , stoking up one fire to keep the  back room warm  all night (for the elderly dogs comfort ).

What might be helpful is to have control of the heating in your back room so that you can keep it heated through the night without heating the whole house. 

A Hive system or something similar might help.

A single radiator at about 3kW output, plus a couple of kW loss in the pipes and boiler would cost around £1.20 per night.

Alternatively, a far-infrared heating panel would keep animals warm without heating the whole room. Maybe a 250-500W panel, costing between 50p and £1 per night. 

Estimates based on an 8 hour heating period over night.

Alternatively, a far-infrared heating panel would keep animals warm without heating the whole room. Maybe a 250-500W panel, costing between 50p and £1 per night. 

That whole FIR lark is something I’ve never experienced. Having lived in an electric convector heater apartment it sure sounds like an improvement. I found this article interesting: https://www.acchaus.com/blog/far-infrared-heating-its-heating-jim-but-not-as-we-know-it/ 

Userlevel 1

Hello folks 

Thankyou  for all the interesting ,and most helpful advice .I am truly grateful 

At the moment my back room ,with fire lit all day ...but just “ticking over” is  hot ! 

Central heating is switched off altogether now in the evenings , and  programmed (and only in the rooms I use ) to come on for 3 hours early morning to  warm the bathroom and hall way . 

Back room is still warm and fire usually easily restored by opening the air inlet in a morning 

Coal bunker was recently refilled ….so I guess Im enjoying half and half comfort ! 

So far ...so good ..and Im very “jumper conscious” thankyou 

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