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Will early exit fee be charged if I leave Scottish Power contract that ends 30.04.2021, if I apply to switch to Pure Planet on 12.03.2021

  • 12 March 2021
  • 3 replies
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Please see subject info regarding my question.

Thanks

Christine

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Best answer by woz 12 March 2021, 15:50

@Christine - March 21 

I disagree (sort of)  (I hate that phrase)

I’d err on the safe side and leave it until 13th or 14th to be absolutely sure, because if you count 12th it’s actually 50 days, so why give SP a possible reason to charge unless Is there a reason it has to be done by 12th?

Also re @Angelabikerbabe’s comment the Ofgem rule is ambiguous (I’ve raised this before) It isn’t clear if the 49 days includes the time at which the switch is applied for or it’s from the actual date the switch happens 17 days later - In your case it’s moot because it will be 49 days on 13th.

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Userlevel 7
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Hi

If you leave a supplier within 49 days of your contract end date you should not be charged exit fees. 

As you are saying your going to apply today, and the switch takes 17 days, then you will definitely be within the 49 days when your switch happens.

So you should not be charged.

Userlevel 7
Badge +11

@Christine - March 21 

I disagree (sort of)  (I hate that phrase)

I’d err on the safe side and leave it until 13th or 14th to be absolutely sure, because if you count 12th it’s actually 50 days, so why give SP a possible reason to charge unless Is there a reason it has to be done by 12th?

Also re @Angelabikerbabe’s comment the Ofgem rule is ambiguous (I’ve raised this before) It isn’t clear if the 49 days includes the time at which the switch is applied for or it’s from the actual date the switch happens 17 days later - In your case it’s moot because it will be 49 days on 13th.

Also re @Angelabikerbabe’s comment the Ofgem rule is ambiguous (I’ve raised this before) It isn’t clear if the 49 days includes the time at which the switch is applied for or it’s from the actual date the switch happens 17 days later - In your case it’s moot because it will be 49 days on 13th.

 

The problem our @woz  is that OFGEM, in their infinite wisdom, mention ‘Switching Window’ all of twice in the Standard Licence Conditions:
Electricity Supply Standard Licence Conditions Consolidated - Current Version.pdf (ofgem.gov.uk)
SLC 24 Termination of domestic supply contracts
24.8 (b)
 “unless the Domestic Customer has already entered into a new Fixed Term Supply Contract with the licensee or paragraph 22C.5 of standard condition 22C applies, a Domestic Customer is entitled to switch to any other Electricity Supplier at any time during or after the Switching Window without having to pay a Termination Fee;”


Switching Window

“For the purposes of this condition “Switching Window” means the period which begins when the Domestic Statement of Renewal Terms is provided to the Domestic Customer, or 49 days before the date the fixed term period of a Fixed Term Supply Contract is due to end (whichever is earlier) and which ends on the date the fixed term period of a Fixed Term Supply Contract is due to end.”

  
Money Saving Expert said here

So what ARE the official rules on exit fees?

Ofgem's rules state that customers must not be charged exit fees if they leave during or after the ‘switching window’, which is defined as "49 calendar days before a fixed-term contract ends".

You can apply to switch at any point during a fixed-term contract without having to pay exit fees, as long as the switch is actually completed during the switching window (emphasis mine).

This story was updated on 6 March 2017 to clarify how Ofgem’s exit fee rules apply to switches started outside the 49-day penalty-free window but completed within it.

However, even they don’t explain where they got the ‘clarification’ from. My logic is, for what little it’s worth.

You don’t ‘switch’ (i.e. leave) your supplier when you ‘apply to switch’ you ‘switch’ on ‘switching day’ therefore, so far as the OFGEM regulations are concerned, when you apply to switch is immaterial, the date the switch takes place is what matters.

Welcome to the world of ‘legal experts’ who think what they are writing is ‘clear’ (National Health Service (Pharmaceutical Services) Regulations 1992 - mumble, grumble.) 
I feel all ‘government regulation’ should be put before a random panel of ‘non-experts’ who are asked ‘what do you think that means?’ before it’s passed into law.

 

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