What puts you off having an EV in your household?

  • 28 January 2019
  • 21 replies
  • 11374 views

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There are a lot of good reasons to have an EV, but what are your reasons for not having one?

What puts you off having an EV in your household?


21 replies

Userlevel 7
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I think no. 5 it should have read "I can get....for a lot less money", otherwise nice poll, and you may even get a badge.. (envious!)
Mine is a combination of no.5 and I don't do enough mileage to justify that level of cost.
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Cost is the main one for me. I guess choice too. I currently want something similar in size to my 5 series. The EV's seem to be Leaf/i3 size or i8 but nothing really in between.

so I wait for my Tesla Model 3 🙂
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An EV would make perfect sense for our family. My commute is only 13 miles each way and I'd get free charging at work.

Size of car is not an issue as those journeys are all just me. The Mrs could use it to ferry the kids around to various clubs on some days (when I'd use the ICE car).

The problem for me is the battery costs. Renting it would mean more cost per month than fuel. Owning it would mean a £5-6.5K battery replacement charge in about 5 years, or massive depreciation as no-one would want to buy a 4.5 year old EV car that might need a £5-6.5K battery replacement any time soon.
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I think you are being unduly pessimistic on battery life. My 30kw leaf has an 8 year battery guarantee and I fully expect it to still have over 75% of capacity available then.
I also expect battery technology to have incrementally improved so third party suppliers will have viable products that are better than the current. Pun apology.
If you want a lot of real world experience of long time ev uses that are uk based check out speakev, a forum site that hosts fora for every make of ev. Great for research
Userlevel 7
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The sole problem for me is simply cost. Buying new is not yet an option.the second hand market has not grown enough to be competitive . 5 yrs time the plan is to buy a new car out of my pension pot, at the moment a tesla is the best on the market for my tastes but new cars are coming thick and fast so who knows.fully charged live will be interessting to try out whats new.
Battery tech is improving every year so i dont think range and battery life will be an issue for me.
To protect the enviroment by as much as i can im hoping my current car lasts until my 55th birthday.
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I really like the look of the Kia e-Niro, especially considering the real world range over 250 miles compared to the price bracket that it is in. If I could afford to buy new it would be where I was looking.
Userlevel 7
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£33,000
that is all...
Jenam93;22348:
I really like the look of the Kia e-Niro, especially considering the real world range over 250 miles compared to the price bracket that it is in. If I could afford to buy new it would be where I was looking.
Userlevel 7
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Like many others, it is the cost from new, pre-owned market not competitive just yet. However, I am actively researching an EV for, possibly, next year. 👍👍
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As prices come down, so will the government subsidy, resulting in high purchase prices for a while yet. The Zoe my sister-in-law collected last week has seen the 8-year battery capacity warranty dropped from 75% to 66%, so it may only manage 120 miles by then.

Lead acid batteries were invented in 1869 and can achieve a Specific Energy of around 40 Wh/kg. Li-ion batteries can just about manage 250 Wh/kg. That's less than 1 order of magnitude in improvement in more than a century and a half. By way of contrast, the number of transistors in an integrated circuit doubles every 2 years and the price halves (Moore's Law).

Whole life costs won't really be understood until resale values are properly established - this will probably take at least a decade.

And because of the low margins, the EV market seems reluctant to tackle the small (cheap) city car market.

I still want an EV though, maybe next time?
There’s just not a good enough infrastructure in place yet. Aberdeenshire and beyond. So this coupled with range of EV’s has me waiting for better. I would like to go ev for my daily but I feel it’s a few years off.
I currently own a campervan as my only vehicle. Doubt whether there will be an affordable version any time soon or that it will be practical to travel as far until infrastructure is improved.
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Hi Suepal,

What sort of camper do you have? I've got a VW T5, but would love their ID.Buzz if they ever make it (and I could afford it!).

https://www.volkswagen.co.uk/electric-hybrid/id/buzz
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Jenam93;22158:

The problem for me is the battery costs. Renting it would mean more cost per month than fuel. Owning it would mean a £5-6.5K battery replacement charge in about 5 years, or massive depreciation as no-one would want to buy a 4.5 year old EV car that might need a £5-6.5K battery replacement any time soon.


I really would not worry about replacement, since most warranties are 8 years. My 8 year old Leaf is doing fine and that is based on the bleeding edge technology back then. Battery chemistry and battery management systems are very advanced now. Also if something did go awry after 8 years the packs are made up of many modules and it would be likely just one module is dropping the voltage...replace that and you are hunky dory. There are a few EV specialists doing that for people eg Indra.co.uk based in Worcester.
I can’t get to Scotland on one charge 😢
Userlevel 7
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you could always stop for a coffee and a charge...
I suppose it depends on how many miles away from Scotland you are...
Marcusreay;22557:
I can’t get to Scotland on one charge ������
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I think an EV also needs a certain change of mindset.

We're all getting used to must have it now, in an instant, can't delay, but driving all the way to Scotland in one go in an ICE car would not be my idea of fun at all so it would have to be broken up regardless.

Having to recharge an EV forces you to stop and take a break, which is good for you and potentially for other road users too (less likely to cause a road incident if you take breaks allegedly).
Userlevel 7
Badge +9
I have not done any research and basically purchase a car and use it until it becomes to expensive to repair.

Always by a car that is popular so can get the parts a little bit cheaper.
Never wash the car other than the odd auto wash.
And never worry if it's not parked outside.

Help....Time is not on my Focus side..ev um..most likely I stick with Petrol.
Lenny;22478:
Hi Suepal,

What sort of camper do you have? I've got a VW T5, but would love their ID.Buzz if they ever make it (and I could afford it!).

https://www.volkswagen.co.uk/electric-hybrid/id/buzz


Hi Lenny, I have a LWB T30 Transporter. Same as yours but a couple of feet longer. Converted by Leisure Drive. I've had it nearly 3 years now and love it.
There's no option for those with an EV to vote on good and bad sides.

Biggest problem for owners is extended journeys with poor infrastructure especially in winter and high initial cost of ownership. Next its the high depreciation and lack of manufacturer support after a 3 year warranty runs out. Options to upgrade existing battery packs also non existent even though possible in Europe.

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BMW I3 battery warranty is not a complete pack change but just enough to meet their capacity stipulation. So it looks good at 8 years or 100k miles but that's not 22kwh but more like 13 kWh gtee. In other words very low winter range after a few years. Degradation is not linear but depends greatly on charge cycles and rate of charge. Leaf pack deg is poor with lots of rapid charging.

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Even with no queues and free rapid charges you have to factor in 30 min stops every 50 miles or so in winter unless you have latest £30k+ EV

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If you move to within 20 miles of the border it could work!
Userlevel 7
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For longish journeys, say 300+ miles, towing, and living in the back of beyond, diesels still rule. But, as most trips are relatively short distance then an EV as a second car makes a lot of sense. When their is a greater choice on the second-hand market I’ll be getting one.
EVs are not affordable plus there are too few charging points.

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