UK's first all-electric forecourt opens.

  • 7 December 2020
  • 7 replies
  • 47 views

I thought it was going to be the Shell one in the adverts, apparently this company's planning to open 100 more.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/dec/07/uk-first-all-electric-car-charging-forecourt-opens-in-essex


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Hahahaha we keep posting at the same time @Ohit :wink:


Clearly the same 10:30am tea break! :wink:

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@25 quid @Ohit @Gwyndy @Marc 

I just read the article and I was struggling to understand the maths…until I did a bit more reading elsewhere. Even then I’m a little bemused by the quoted figures.

 

 

Great work on going through all the detail.

I actively avoid consuming the news/mainstream media and also never expect them to get it “right”.
 

The view I have taken with EV driving is there’s Tesla charging and then everything/everyone else. And I work out my own numbers for our own route planning.

 

This GridServe site above looks fantastic and it is exciting how they are planning on building so many more around the UK. It is very much needed, both for EV charging and for rethinking how service stations are offered/presented.

 

We plan on making a trip up there soon to see/use it as part of a Sunday roast food trip or similar.

Hahahaha we keep posting at the same time @Ohit :wink:

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I thought it was going to be the Shell one in the adverts, apparently this company's planning to open 100 more.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/dec/07/uk-first-all-electric-car-charging-forecourt-opens-in-essex


Thanks for posting!

 

Video here :

 

All the public charging I’ve done has been with ‘rapid’ chargers which is 50kWh. So far I’ve need to hang about for 30 minutes at the most - enough time for a cofffee - and it’ll get me to about 80% or thereabouts. And I’m never at 0% battery when I start charging, of course. 

Here’s the guide I use for my clapped out omnibus! :laughing:

The Teslas can handle 150kWh chargers. Not sure which other EVs can.

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@25 quid @Ohit @Gwyndy @Marc 

I just read the article and I was struggling to understand the maths…until I did a bit more reading elsewhere. Even then I’m a little bemused by the quoted figures.

The total kW supplied is said to be 350kW,  after reading elsewhere that appears to  refer to one or more charger, not that I can think of a vehicle that charges at 350kW, afaik, the maximum Tesla support in V3 is 250kW peak.

Reported elsewhere is (and I don’t know the actual mix) “the charger capacities range from 7kW (why 7kW**?) to 350kW” - (36 cars at 350KW would need a supply of over 12MW, that might dim the lights a bit...the solar farm up the road is only 10MW peak)  although allegedly there is battery capacity of 6mW to even out demand - (yes milliwatt*) - thank you Guardian  (this is funny because of the correction at the end of the article)

*

but they missed milli to Mega…

 

anyway to continue...

To add 200 miles of driving range in 20 mins even at the assumed 4.3 miles/kWh (which is generous because real world figures are probably nearer 3.5) would mean topping up with 47kW in 20 mins (or if you use the 3.5 figure 57kWh). This ignores any charging losses.

That would require a charge rate of around 150kW in an hour

Assuming that for every car would roughly equate to a conservative 5.5 to 6 MW of supply required.

Fortunately (for them) that isn’t going to happen any time soon as most evs top out at about 50kW, but it will increase with time.

This means that your average bloke on the Clapham Omnibus (or the Nissan Leaf Omnibus) isn’t going to be getting 200 miles in 20 minutes anytime soon, more like well over an hour, but there is a Costa Coffee and wifi so that’s OK.

and it’s 24p/kWh...(plus one or two Costa coffees)

It’s a step in the right direction so good on them….

(At 7kW it would take 5 or 6 hours for 200 miles hence my question above, perhaps some older vehicles have a maximum of 7kW?)

 

 

 

 

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Very exciting news @Gwyndy 

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