POLL: Will you be driving an electric vehicle before 2035?

  • 4 February 2020
  • 25 replies
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  • Community Manager
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The last date to buy a new petrol, diesel or hybrid car in the UK will be brought forward from 2040 to 2035, under Government plans.

The change is being made to help Britain achieve virtually zero carbon emissions by the middle of the century, the BBC reports.

Do you think you'll be driving a pure electric vehicle before 2035? Should the 'deadline' be even earlier?

Should the last date to buy a new petrol, diesel or hybrid car in the UK will be brought forward?


25 replies

In 2050 will our children be cursing us for making this decision when they are surrounded by millions of batteries that cannot be recycled? I agree something needs to be done to solve the climate emergency but is this the next diesel scandal, where poorly throughout Government policy for quick wins leads to longer term problems? Have Government really looked at the whole life of these vehicles and the embedded carbon?
ChrisH;47768:
In 2050 will our children be cursing us for making this decision when they are surrounded by millions of batteries that cannot be recycled? I agree something needs to be done to solve the climate emergency but is this the next diesel scandal, where poorly throughout Government policy for quick wins leads to longer term problems? Have Government really looked at the whole life of these vehicles and the embedded carbon?


Good point @ChrisH
I've read in numerous places that about 5% of lithium batteries are being recycled right now. Not just the EV batteries, but all the ones in phones, cameras etc etc.
My feeling is that the recycling of EV batteries is going to be another growth industry. It's already starting to happen.
Check out this Bloomberg article which has info about old Nissan Leaf batteries being used to power home energy storage, street lights, data centres.



I don't know whether the UK Government is thinking about this, though....
Userlevel 7
Badge +9
Glad to see the date getting moved closer instead of a pointless delay, pleased that they have also incorporated hybrid into this ban. My feeling is that it will happen earlier by default as by 2030 surly no manufacturer will still be putting out petrol/diesel models and fuel stations will start to be converted into charging stations with cafes and the such like to make them destinations as opposed to current splash and dash shops.
Userlevel 7
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Putting aside the fact that this is needed to reduce pollution and emissions the repercussions of this are enormous.
Even if the assumed life of a vehicle is assumed to be only 10 years (it's longer for many) I can't see any manufacturer wanting to produce or buyer wanting to buy internal combustion vehicles much after 2025/2026. The development of a new vehicle can take well over 5 years and long term planning even longer,
I don't see this as realistically achievable without huge £££ government investment and incentives
I also see this as akin to another Brexit. People want lower emissions, but some don't want to have to drastically change their lifestyle or have to pay (or perhaps can't pay) for it.

If you ask people whether there are too many vehicles on the road most will say yes
If you ask them if they would give up their vehicle most would say no.
Jon1;47809:
My feeling is that it will happen earlier by default as by 2030 surly no manufacturer will still be putting out petrol/diesel models and fuel stations will start to be converted into charging stations with cafes and the such like to make them destinations as opposed to current splash and dash shops.


Yes, I hadn't thought about that @Jon1
Maybe it'll also mean that petrol cars will also get really expensive? As there'll be fewer made, and demand might still be quite high.
woz;47813:
Putting aside the fact that this is needed to reduce pollution and emissions the repercussions of this are enormous.
Even if the assumed life of a vehicle is assumed to be only 10 years (it's longer for many) I can't see any manufacturer wanting to produce or buyer wanting to buy internal combustion vehicles much after 2025/2026. The development of a new vehicle can take well over 5 years and long term planning even longer,
I don't see this as realistically achievable without huge £££ government investment and incentives
I also see this as akin to another Brexit. People want lower emissions, but some don't want to have to drastically change their lifestyle or have to pay (or perhaps can't pay) for it.

If you ask people whether there are too many vehicles on the road most will say yes
If you ask them if they would give up their vehicle most would say no.


Hey @woz
It's definitely ambitious!
The other impact of all drivers switching to EVs is..... a 30% increase in electricity usage.
So we'd better not all try to charge at once!
(Seriously though..... that's what smart meters will be for).

​​​​​​​It'll be fine. Fine!
Userlevel 7
Badge +11
Marc, I admire your positivity
​​​​​​​Look upon it as another government infrastructure project, what could possibly go wrong...
(just ignoring Crossrail, HS2, NHS I.T. infrastructure, Housing, Smart metering etc.)

Marc;47815:
Hey @woz
It's definitely ambitious!
The other impact of all drivers switching to EVs is..... a 30% increase in electricity usage.
So we'd better not all try to charge at once!
(Seriously though..... that's what smart meters will be for).

​​​​​​​It'll be fine. Fine!
Userlevel 7
Badge +9
Hi all

​​​​​​​My feeling is that this is a meaningless gesture - reenvisioning public transport and beginning a serious discussion about alternatives to individualized transport is urgently needed. The current increasing individual vehicle ownership is unsustainable, regardless of the method of propulsion. Community EV taxi-buses linked to revitalised local and national train network? New thinking urgently required...
Userlevel 7
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Will more EVs lead to road pricing, I think it's inevitable once ICE vehicle ownership is reduced, how else will the government recoup the lost fuel duty revenue
@Marc, thanks for the links an interesting read. I agree recycling of batteries will no doubt be a growth industry but with that will no doubt come other issues in terms of unscrupulous businesses putting employees at risk to remove the base metals. I think I’m with @stephenrand; we need to reenvision public transport. Ultimately there is only so much road space. We need to have more Mass Transit and complimentary bus services, if cities like Nottingham can rival London for providing top notch public transport I’m sure others cities can do too. As the below shows a good Mass Transit system can make great use of available road space.

I’d rather Government support such schemes than provide EV subsidies for more cars on the road.
ChrisH;47843:
@Marc, thanks for the links an interesting read. I agree recycling of batteries will no doubt be a growth industry but with that will no doubt come other issues in terms of unscrupulous businesses putting employees at risk to remove the base metals. I think I’m with @stephenrand; we need to reenvision public transport. Ultimately there is only so much road space. We need to have more Mass Transit and complimentary bus services, if cities like Nottingham can rival London for providing top notch public transport I’m sure others cities can do too. As the below shows a good Mass Transit system can make great use of available road space.
3544
I’d rather Government support such schemes than provide EV subsidies for more cars on the road.


Yes great shout @ChrisH
I haven't seen any electric buses yet, I don't think.
Just a matter of time I suppose. They'll need some whopper-sized batteries to get up the hills of Bath, that's for sure!
@Marc. If you fancy a bit of bus spotting on a quiet weekend and a trip up north there is a fleet of electric buses operating in Harrogate.

Or if you fancy a trip to the midlands Nottingham have introduced a fleet of biogas buses https://www.nottinghampost.com/news/nottingham-news/how-nottinghams-buses-revolutionising-public-3736463. Happy spotting 😉
@ChrisH We have a biogas buses in Bristol, too - lovingly nicknamed the 'poo bus' by locals 🤣🤦

Have you seen the news today about the government's "£50m plan to create first all-electric bus town" (on the BBC)?
Badge +2
Overall I'm for it asap. Its interesting Hydrogen cars will be allowed - although there aren't any on the ecommercial market yet. Battery tech is developing rapidly but it's a good point about recycling. Hopefully that will be following close behind in the tech evolution.

However, I still don't think we have the infrastructure (or incentives to go electric, build infra) in the UK. It's better but now where near enough. And typical of the government to annouce a headline policy without any joined up thinking of what is needed elsewhere.

But I do intend to go electric asap. I'd like it to be my next car. I might have one more diesel left though
Badge +2
They were doing some tests in Sheffield with Electric busses - but I can't recall reading about the result. There are a LOT of hills in sheffield...
@Nataly, I did spot the news this morning and had a little chuckle to myself, whilst I was sat on my diesel train.
Userlevel 6
I really want to go hybrid for my next car, as you know @Marc but unless something drastically changes I doubt most common folk will feel the need to without serious incentives. EVs are still far too expensive when you can get a diesel or petrol for a fraction of the cost.

In other news I think I've narrowed it down to a Kia Niro or Hyundai Kona - both PHEVs as I'm not brave enough to go full electric just yet (maybe in 2-3 years for my next one!)

Also, there needs to be bigger incentives for smart charging, smart tariffs and home generation/batteries. Another thing putting me off going full electric at the moment is how to charge the damn thing. The current PP single tariff approach is great and still considerably cheaper than others in my area (not THE cheapest but am not looking to move for a few pounds a year) however, there are other suppliers out there starting to look at smart tariffs and they are becoming more an more attractive to those, like myself, considering EVs. I don't fancy paying a flat rate for all my electric when I have a big, power-hungry battery on the drive that needs charging daily.
Userlevel 7
Badge +9
New Porsche Taycan tested on Top Gear. Awesome speeds! Awesome car, sooooo quiet. 140k if you fancy one 🙀😂😂😂👍
ChrisH;47937:
@Marc. If you fancy a bit of bus spotting on a quiet weekend and a trip up north there is a fleet of electric buses operating in Harrogate.
3551
Or if you fancy a trip to the midlands Nottingham have introduced a fleet of biogas buses https://www.nottinghampost.com/news/nottingham-news/how-nottinghams-buses-revolutionising-public-3736463. Happy spotting 😉


Now that is cool @ChrisH
Can I catch one all the way to Harrogate? 😃
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Userlevel 3
I think it's an excellent move by the government to bring the date forward by 5 years, but the really brave step was to include hybrids in the ban. Going from pure diesel / petrol to hybrids is not much of a change on terms of range and power, but going all electric is another matter.

Getting diesel HGV's to be fully electric will be a big ask. (Hydrogen is possible but we've a long way to go in terms of getting the costs down to diesel levels.)

And range is an issue for many of us. I mostly travel less than 40 miles in a day so battery is fine for that, but perhaps once a month have to do 300-400 miles in a day. So I was thinking of plug-in hybrid. But maybe I'll just have to charge-up half way (train isn't an option where I need to get to.)

But the main thing is that the government's announcement makes it very clear to the car manufacturers that they are wasting their time further developing petrol and diesel engines, and they MUST focus all their resources on electric and/or hydrogen.

I suppose one answer to the problem of the range of electric HGV's: have an overhead electric catenary line (like the overhead power lines powering most electric trains) on selected parts of the motorways. Then an HGV could hook up to the overhead catenary and charge up its batteries as it goes. That way the HGV would only need sufficient battery power for perhaps 60-100 miles. Otherwise the HGV would have to use a lot of its energy lugging a massive battery around, which in turn requires more power.

Another alternative, one I'd like to see, is to:
​​​​​​​1. Electrify all main rail lines
2. Have local collection and delivery electric HGVs collect containers (or half or quarter containers) from businesses, and take them to a nearby train station
3. Have these containers automatically or semi-automatically loaded onto trains to take them to the closest train station to their final destination
4. Local delivery of containers to destination, again by electric HGV

This would mean an all electric system, dramatically cutting emissions.
Much of the HGV traffic and trains could be over-night, benefitting from off-peak electricity.
There'd be a big reduction in motorway traffic, cutting down on things like tyre wear (and pollution from micro-particles of tyres).

But both of these alternatives will require massive co-operation from the government and industry.
Userlevel 3
Some of the designs that might be applied to electric trucks:

​​​​​​​https://www.scania.com/group/en/worlds-first-electric-road-opens-in-sweden/
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/apr/12/worlds-first-electrified-road-for-charging-vehicles-opens-in-sweden
@Adam2, I recently heard of this company and the electric truck they are developing https://voltatrucks.com/.
Userlevel 7
Badge +9
Well i have almost decided that im going to get an electric mini in 2 years time, and today spotted my local BP is getting ready for its arrival.
​​​​​​​

And the latest on this that the ban on ICE cars will be brought forward again to 2030.

2030! That’s like…… really soon :relaxed: The BBC and The Guardian are both reporting it’ll be announced officially this week.

Will we be ready?

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And the latest on this that the ban on ICE cars will be brought forward again to 2030.

2030! That’s like…… really soon :relaxed: The BBC and The Guardian are both reporting it’ll be announced officially this week.

Will we be ready?


The parameter has been set. So we will become ready as we will have to be.

In general, I see less car usage too over time too. For example, cycling and walking infrastructure will be improved (it is already underway), more working from home and increased home deliveries.

I personally look forward to a time when cars are considered and used for recreational purposes, just like they were when they first hit the mass markets/middle classes.

That’s how the Michelin food/stars guide started!

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