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EV tariffs

  • 19 December 2020
  • 5 replies
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I'm about to take delivery of EV and started looking at tariffs and found one particular good supplier who offers two tariffs, named Go and Agile.

 

The Go tariff is an obvious choice for EV users offering 4 hour at night @ 5p kwh and 13.5p kwh the rest of the time. Seems too good to be true but it is true. Do pure plant have plans to offer similar? If not I'm going to have to switch.

Regards Mark 

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Best answer by Angelabikerbabe 19 December 2020, 18:37

Hi.

heres a link that may answer your question:

 

 

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5 replies

Userlevel 7
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Hi.

heres a link that may answer your question:

 

 

Userlevel 7
Badge +11

@Thegreatorm

the Agile tariff uses “plunge pricing”, peak demand rates are capped at 35p/kWh

Have you actually had a quote for the the GO tariff for your area ?  I couldn’t get prices off the website, the nearest I got was here and here 

Also you will be put on a more expensive interim tariff which will be nearer 16p/kWh until it’s set up.(with no guarantee of when that will be if at all)

 

Just going off at a slight tangent here...

Out of curiosity if you were to use the 4 hours as efficiently as possible and you charged at the rates below and assuming a moderate 3.5 miles per kWh and you saved 9p/kWh*  below is what you’d achieve daily. (*the 9p is the difference between say 0.14p/kWh and 5p/kWh)

An annual mileage of say 180 miles a week as an example (9000 miles a year)

7kW around †25kWh/night 88miles saving maximum of £2.50/day  (2 or 3) days a week charging used)

3.7kW †13.3kW/night 47miles saving maximum of £1.30/day     (3.8 i.e 4 days a week used)

2.3kW †8.3kWh/night 29 miles saving maximum of £0.82/day   (6.2 days i.e. every day used)

Thus practical saving would thus be about £5 a week, give or take

(† I’ve rounded it down a little 10% to allow for the fact that you’d never achieve the absolute maximum every day, losses etc.). 

(These are pretty much best case figures aside from the fact that if you need to charge from a public charger the saving would be more than that quoted)

Draw your own conclusions depending on how many days you’re likely to charge…

I feel a spreadsheet coming on...nooooo

(PP need to get their offering out as quickly as humanly possible)

Userlevel 2

@Thegreatorm

the Agile tariff uses “plunge pricing”, peak demand rates are capped at 35p/kWh

Have you actually had a quote for the the GO tariff for your area ?  I couldn’t get prices off the website, the nearest I got was here and here 

Also you will be put on a more expensive interim tariff which will be nearer 16p/kWh until it’s set up.(with no guarantee of when that will be if at all)

 

Just going off at a slight tangent here...

Out of curiosity if you were to use the 4 hours as efficiently as possible and you charged at the rates below and assuming a moderate 3.5 miles per kWh and you saved 9p/kWh*  below is what you’d achieve daily. (*the 9p is the difference between say 0.14p/kWh and 5p/kWh)

An annual mileage of say 180 miles a week as an example (9000 miles a year)

7kW around †25kWh/night 88miles saving maximum of £2.50/day  (2 or 3) days a week charging used)

3.7kW †13.3kW/night 47miles saving maximum of £1.30/day     (3.8 i.e 4 days a week used)

2.3kW †8.3kWh/night 29 miles saving maximum of £0.82/day   (6.2 days i.e. every day used)

Thus practical saving would thus be about £5 a week, give or take

(† I’ve rounded it down a little 10% to allow for the fact that you’d never achieve the absolute maximum every day, losses etc.). 

(These are pretty much best case figures aside from the fact that if you need to charge from a public charger the saving would be more than that quoted)

Draw your own conclusions depending on how many days you’re likely to charge…

I feel a spreadsheet coming on...nooooo

(PP need to get their offering out as quickly as humanly possible)

I think your maths is off. At the simplest level, you can save 10p per kw for 4 hours. With a 7kw home charger, that means 7x4x10p. That is a Max saving of £2.80 per day or £1,022 per year. 
I did a spreadsheet and it worked out at £800 a year for us, with 2 EVs on balance. 

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I think your maths is off. At the simplest level, you can save 10p per kw for 4 hours. With a 7kw home charger, that means 7x4x10p. That is a Max saving of £2.80 per day or £1,022 per year. 
I did a spreadsheet and it worked out at £800 a year for us, with 2 EVs on balance. 

Yep - my spreadsheet numbers are similar (if we do ~200 miles of driving everyday, which we don’t). Especially so given we plan on turning on other charging related things during that window. Small fry : e.g. device chargers, but it’s a start!

Userlevel 7
Badge +11

@Thegreatorm

the Agile tariff uses “plunge pricing”, peak demand rates are capped at 35p/kWh

Have you actually had a quote for the the GO tariff for your area ?  I couldn’t get prices off the website, the nearest I got was here and here 

Also you will be put on a more expensive interim tariff which will be nearer 16p/kWh until it’s set up.(with no guarantee of when that will be if at all)

 

Just going off at a slight tangent here...

Out of curiosity if you were to use the 4 hours as efficiently as possible and you charged at the rates below and assuming a moderate 3.5 miles per kWh and you saved 9p/kWh*  below is what you’d achieve daily. (*the 9p is the difference between say 0.14p/kWh and 5p/kWh)

An annual mileage of say 180 miles a week as an example (9000 miles a year)

7kW around †25kWh/night 88miles saving maximum of £2.50/day  (2 or 3) days a week charging used)

3.7kW †13.3kW/night 47miles saving maximum of £1.30/day     (3.8 i.e 4 days a week used)

2.3kW †8.3kWh/night 29 miles saving maximum of £0.82/day   (6.2 days i.e. every day used)

Thus practical saving would thus be about £5 a week, give or take

(† I’ve rounded it down a little 10% to allow for the fact that you’d never achieve the absolute maximum every day, losses etc.). 

(These are pretty much best case figures aside from the fact that if you need to charge from a public charger the saving would be more than that quoted)

Draw your own conclusions depending on how many days you’re likely to charge…

I feel a spreadsheet coming on...nooooo

(PP need to get their offering out as quickly as humanly possible)

I think your maths is off. At the simplest level, you can save 10p per kw for 4 hours. With a 7kw home charger, that means 7x4x10p. That is a Max saving of £2.80 per day or £1,022 per year. 
I did a spreadsheet and it worked out at £800 a year for us, with 2 EVs on balance. 

@Thegreatorm

My maths isn’t off. A spreadsheet is theoretical, as  I based my estimate on practicalities, we’ll have to beg to differ.

A spreadsheet is based on getting the maximum out of the tariff, (everything being maximised) and in reality that won’t happen. Mine might be on the low side, I agree that with discipline and perfect mileage the savings would be greater. I stand by my estimation and in fact we aren’t that far apart, mine was based on one EV, your figure on two. I said £260 a year for one you said £400. (of course either saving would be a win!)

Happy New Year! (almost there...)

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